Highlights

Highlights

Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team

February 01, 2018

We're very excited to return to the Enduro World Series in 2018 and announce the formation of our new Canadian partnership with Race Face Performance Products. We're incredibly proud to form the Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team, and to tackle a full season of racing with passion, drive, and dedication.

EWS Team
Our two brands have a deep history together that began in 1993. When freeride was born Rocky Mountain and Race Face were there, under the same roof, meeting the needs of demanding North Shore riders. Now, 25 years later Race Face is making some of the best components in the world, and we're honored to be officially reunited through our EWS team partnership.

TEAM RIDERS

Jesse Melamed

EWS Team

EWS Team2017 SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

  • 12th EWS Series Overall Ranking
  • 1st EWS Whistler, Canada

I'm excited to start a new chapter of this team, with Race Face on board to strengthen the Canadian vibe. I'm really looking forward to working closely with another local brand that shares my passion and roots. The crash I had in Finale Ligure at the end of last season was a tough one to recover from, but I've been training hard and am confident I am going to come into the first race strong!" - Jesse Melamed

Remi GauvinEWS Team

EWS Team2017 SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

  • 8th EWS Series Overall Ranking
  • 5th EWS Whistler, Canada

"Partnering up with Race Face and their strong Canadian roots is something that is unique to the EWS and exciting for myself. I'm really looking forward to getting things kicked off in South America in a few weeks, traveling with Jesse, ALN, our new crew of mechanics and Team Manager! This off season has been really productive for me, and I feel super-strong coming into the first round." - Remi Gauvin

ALNEWS Team

EWS Team2017 SEASON HIGHLIGHTS

  • 11th EWS Series Overall Ranking 
  • 3rd EWS Wicklow, Ireland

"I feel really happy and at home with our team for 2018. With such a good set up, it really is a bittersweet feeling to be sidelined for the two first rounds with a wrist injury. With the team supporting me, the matter at hand is to regain my maximum shred capacity to join the party ASAP. I look forward to seeing us evolve as a team this season and to enjoy not only the racing but the whole vibe." - ALN

Rocky Mountain Bicycles R amp D CentreEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamEWS TeamWe would also like to extend a huge thank you to the team sponsors!
Team Sponsors

Zurück Highlights Altitude Powerplay now available in Canada We first launched the Altitude Powerplay in Europe back in July, and after an incredible season abroad, we’re proud to bring it home and announce its availability in Canada.
Vor Highlights Resolutions So, what does it take to race hard plus earn an Economics or Kinesiology degree in the off season? Teamwork and resilience. The Rocky Mountain/7mesh riders know that success means more than lung capacity and enlarged quads. It’s a life balance only helped further by sticking together, and shaming each other about eating cookies.
Highlights

Resolutions

January 11, 2018

Partners in Grime

For many, completing post-secondary schooling is a difficult task. For others, training and racing for Canada’s grueling weather is overwhelming. But what about doing both? Victoria, B.C. racers and roommates Felix Burke and Quinn Moberg manage to tackle an ambitious lifestyle consisting of equal parts education and maintenance of a competitive national ranking on Canada’s XC racing circuit.

What does it take to race hard plus earn an Economics or Kinesiology degree in the off season? Teamwork and resilience. The Rocky Mountain/7Mesh riders know that success means more than lung capacity and enlarged quads. It’s a life balance only helped further by sticking together, and shaming each other about eating cookies.

Felix Burke Interview

MB: How long have you been racing?
FB: I have been racing since first year junior, so this year will be my sixth season racing. I guess professionally this will be my fourth year.

MB: Explain how you grew up both in B.C. and Quebec.
FB: When I was 13 my family moved from Tremblant, QC to Whistler. My mom got a job opportunity there and my parents wanted to live an adventure—they both grew up on the east coast and saw Whistler as the mecca. Both are into skiing and outdoor activities. So we moved to Whistler and it was there that I discovered mountain biking, through some friends I had met on the ski hill. In the summer, they were riding and I just kind of tagged along and loved it, and the community. I started doing the local races with my dad and there was this thing called the Lumpy Award (awarded to local youth who Whistler Off Road Cycling Association directors feel best exemplifies their values – ed). Once I found out that it existed, I focused on it. Trying to get better. I guess that is when I first started training.

MB: And why did you end up moving to QC?
FB: When I was 16, my mom got another job opportunity in Tremblant. My parents decided to move back for a number of reasons. I was worried. I thought all of the cool mountain biking was in B.C., but it turns out that the XC scene is really big on the East Coast. I just jumped into the more classic XC and I got a coach, and my parents saw how much I loved it. They had been worried that they were taking me away from something that I loved. I knew I was going to come back eventually.

MB: When you moved back to Tremblant from Whistler your bike handling skills must have been strong relative to the local scene?
FB: For sure. When I came back I had the skills. And when you are younger you push yourself in a way that is harder to do when you get older. You know, your friend hucks off something and you are like, well, I gotta do it now I guess. I think it’s good that I got to do it when I was younger because my skills…I don’t feel like I practiced them too much. I just feel like I have them naturally. And I think it’s because of growing up as a younger riding in Whistler going off drops and riding in the bike park. I think it just sticks with you.

MB: So when did you and Quinn [Moberg] meet?
FB: It’s kind of a funny story how I met Quinn. I knew who he was, so I looked up to him, and then at the end of the summer before I moved back to Tremblant there was a Team BC selection camp. I knew I was moving away but I wanted to meet the coach and see what the environment was like. They set up a bunch of races and that’s where I met Quinn. We did a time trial, and I had a great time. Quinn invited me to stay at his place in Squamish, because I was living in Whistler and the camp was in Squamish. I had never talked to the guy, but I respected him and knew who he was.

We kind of kept in touch, like if he had a good result I sent him an email, and if I had a good result he sent me an email and we started planning trips together. When I moved out here my first year of UVIC I didn’t have a place to stay and I sent him a message and he said come live with us and that’s really when we got to become good friends. We’ve got a really good set up.

MB: University keeps a man busy. How often do your training schedules intersect?
FB: I would say regularly, but what makes it hard is our school schedule. We don’t have the same school schedule and so it makes it hard to coordinate training times so if I have classes in the morning and he doesn’t he’ll go training in the morning and I will come back and go in the afternoon and that makes it hard but almost every weekend we get one ride in together and as much as we can time it with school. Basically, as much as we can. Probably about two rides a week I would say.

MB: How important is it to have someone that is easily accessible to train with?
FB: It’s huge. I think on the bike it’s important, but I think the biggest part is off the bike. So much of the training and the benefits and the ways that you want to progress happens off the bike. And Quinn and I keep each other motivated and if I see Quinn eating something unhealthy I’m like ‘are you sure you want to be eating that?’ He’ll say the same thing for me, and we support each other. Sometimes motivation is low when you’ve got other stuff going on. I think that’s where it really comes in.

MB: Many people have a hard time just getting through University, and yet you have a race career as well. How do you prioritize?
FB: I think a lot of it is just planning and thinking in advance. And I prioritize both equally. I think in the fall I prioritize school a little bit more. Because I know that the training is a little less important at that time of year. And I take more courses. And then in the spring I prioritize biking so I plan my homework in advance and get to go for longer rides on the weekend and never kind of get caught off guard with the homework or anything like that.

MB: Do you feel like you’re missing out on the party lifestyle of school?
FB: We are not living the mainstream school life, which can be hard sometimes. You have these friends who party and they have these stories you don’t have. But I don’t feel like I am missing out on social stuff because I am hanging out with my buddy and we’re doing the same thing. It’s kind of like working on a project with a friend.

MB: What about the riding in Victoria?
FB: I really enjoy it. There’s plenty of gnarly stuff. The biggest thing is I love is the mountains…getting up into the alpine. I love doing something epic and that’s the only thing it’s missing. But the potential for adventure is huge. Out in Sooke—once you get in those woods—it feels really wild.

Victoria is the best spot for training. A super good community of riders that support each other. A bunch of racing. The road riding is great. Because it’s raining a lot, you get used to riding the challenging terrain and conditions that constant rain creates. When you go elsewhere you bring those skills with you. You go to a race course in California and people are calling it a hard course but it’s sunny and beautiful and it’s a great day for mountain biking.

MB: You and Quinn are buddies, but do you have to be friends with a training partner to be successful?
FB: For me, I have to train with buddies. I’ve trained with the national team, where you ride with super talented riders and learn as much as you can. But it’s hard to be a in an environment where you are competitive all the time. It’s just not a life I want to live all the time. I prefer to train with people that I can hang out with after. It’s a social thing…especially when you’re doing base miles, talking about world problems, relationships, etc while you ride…it’s a lot easier to balance everything. You don’t have a lot of time to go out and do different things when you are living this life so it helps when your social life is your riding life.

MB: What has Quinn done for your riding?
FB: Quinn is probably the smartest guy I know. His approach helps me the same way he does. He takes a different look on it. For example, when you plan trips, Quinn will analyze things in a way other racers won’t. He’s also a great bike mechanic. He helps me with bike set up. On the bike, Quinn is really tough. He won’t complain. He won’t pull out. I mean, obviously within reason. If he’s bleeding or something…[laughter]. That helps me. If I am tired but he’s still going, I won’t complain either. We’ll just get it done. Our riding styles complement each other as well. He’s a punchy rider and sometimes I have to ride his style. I usually hold a solid pace but it’s good to balance each other out with different styles of riding and training.

I finished high school and moved back here and now I’m going to UVic and riding for Rocky and when I was younger in Whistler I saw the guys riding for Rocky and I always looked up to them. It’s kind of a dream come true. Even though I’m from the east coast and people don’t really understand, I feel like I grew up with the West Coast riding culture and riding for Rocky is a dream come true.

Quinn Moberg Interview

MB: Do you remember the first time you met Felix?
QM: It was around 2012 and we were at a Cycling BC team camp together. It was right before he moved to Quebec and he actually stayed at my house. And we weren’t friends, I had never met him.

MB: And so you were both at a high level at that time?
QM: For our age, yeah. We weren’t phenomes by any means.

MB: You’re grinders?
QM: Yeah, closer to that end of the spectrum I would say.

MB: Racing XC in the Sea-to-Sky—where it’s predominantly an all-mountain/freeride bike culture—is there an automatic kinship when you meet someone that is geared toward XC?
QM: I think so. When I was living in Squamish I was never good buddies with Felix. We moved to Victoria at the same time and that’s when we started to become close, but I knew him for a few years when I was in Victoria and he was in Tramblant. There is a fairly close-nit group of cross country racers in Sea-to-Sky and on Vancouver Island and Sunshine Coast…but there is a style. If we go to race around the country there is a west-coast style. I think it’s derived from what you are explaining, that casual freeride…you know, mountain biking. It’s represented in our racing style.

MB: Tell me about the moving from Squamish to Victoria.
QM: This is my third year [in Uni]. Victoria is rad. I wouldn’t say it’s better or worse than Squamish, I like Squamish too, but there are pros and cons. The weather is better in Victoria. The “true” mountain biking is obviously better in Squamish. Training is good in Victoria…there are good training partners, the forest is beautiful the terrain we ride in is unbelievable. Same as Squamish but it’s different. We’ve got Arbutus trees, moss and rocks and ocean here. Even though Squamish is a community on the water you don’t ride by it every day.

MB: Other than the fact that you have year-round riding, has Victoria’s riding scene or the Victoria riding style affected yours at all?
QM: Yes, for sure. It has improved my riding a lot. Believe it or not. In the Sea-to-Sky corridor there are definitely tech sections, but a lot of what is “tech” is just having big balls. You have to just man up and ride it. In Victoria, there is some of that but it’s few and far between. But it’s still real tech, and it’s humbling because you don’t have to “man up” all the time but you have to be on it. Really focused. The rock is a lot slicker here. There is more root. A lot less groomed terrain. Probably because the bike scene is a lot smaller. But it’s a lot more technical. And I think that catches people by surprise. But you lose that big-line, all-mountain feel. You never feel out there, but it’s nice in other ways.

MB: If you are an XC racer, you need to be able to get quickly through technical terrain…trails that might not be fall-and-get-hurt-type terrain, but if you aren’t on your game you are going to lose a lot of time.
QM: Yup. When you are mountain biking in Victoria, if you aren’t on it 100%, it’s going to really show. In Squamish, leaving my parent’s house and going to ride Rupert’s or another “average” Squamish trail, you don’t have to be that dialed to make your way down. Or up. But if you came to Victoria and you weren’t focused or fresh or ready to go mountain biking, you are going to be slow. I guess that’s the biggest thing that Victoria has taught me. The focus, and riding technical stuff.

MB: It’s great that Vancouver Islanders get to ride all year, but it comes with a whole new level of wet and gnarly weather. You guys are probably training four or five months in pretty wet weather? How does that shape you?
QM: It makes you tough, for sure. You can ride all year, but it’s five degrees Celsius and raining. There’s no excuse not to… but it makes you hard, for sure. I think it’s advantageous. Spending the time…I’m not going to use the word miserable. That’s something that I’m trying to avoid. But it’s hard. It’s hard to do.

 

MB: What about gear? Do you think that a company—or at least an R&D team—must be based on the wet, west coast in order to build product for it?
QM: It’s an advantage for sure, and I am conscious of it. Felix and I train a lot together and bounce ideas off each other but there are also other guys in town. Felix and I have the same gear. It’s a huge advantage having what we have. We can be way more comfortable. Our bikes are made to ride what we ride what we’re riding. We are set up very well, even with the parts our bikes are built with.

MB: When you talk about XC racing, especially, every advantage is a good one. It’s often just the tiny little ones that help.
QM: Being literally as comfortable as possible. It’s unreal. It’s really nice to have.

MB: What is the difference between a solo ride and a ride with Felix?
QM: There is an extra push with Felix. I don’t have the vocabulary to describe it, but we are somewhat competitive, in the sense that we push each other, he pushes me in a lot of facets of my life close to what my maximum would be. But it’s not competitive. I don’t want to better than him. I want him to be as good as he can and if that’s better than me, that’s perfect. But I am pushed by him. And it’s not just the training. It’s having that person there that is going through training and school. It keeps you accountable. It would be very easy to just gap and not get school work done.

MB: In mountain biking, there are a lot of “teams,” but how often are they actually working together? I know in road biking it’s a lot more common, but it seems like you have a more traditional relationship, where you are pushing and living and training with each other and it all becomes holistic in a way.
QM: Absolutely. I think it’s pretty unique. I have been on the Rocky team and a couple of smaller teams but I have never looked at my “teammates” as someone that I am working with. They are just sponsored by the same person. And I think that if Felix and I were sponsored by different people we would still work together. Having that same sponsorship, there is something extra special there.

MB: University seems impressive to me on its own, but you guys are taking almost a full class load and also racing at a competitive level. Do you miss out on other parts of your life because of it?
QM: Thanks, yeah, I think I do. There is definitely a big sacrifice. People talk about a university experience…and I don’t know if I missed it. I mean, my life doesn’t suck at all, but I don’t party very frequently, or barely at all. And I skip out on post lecture hangouts in the hall between class. I try to be really efficient with my time, that hang-out time is sacrificed. The biggest thing is staying organized with your time and focus and, once you are organized, committing to that. Not letting up. But to be clear I’m not upset about anything. If I wanted to do something different I would just do it. I’m doing this because I want to.

MB: I asked Felix what you have been able to teach him. What has he been able to teach you?
QM: A few biking things: he’s a really skilled rider. I think his skills are underrated. So, bike skills are a big thing…just following his speed on trails. It pushes me. He’s damn good bike rider. Life balance also. Sometimes I’ll get obsessed with biking or school or some other thing on my mind and I think Felix keeps me stay healthy.

Tags:

Zurück Highlights Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team With the 2018 Enduro World Series season just around the corner, we're excited to announce the formation of our new Canadian partnership with Race Face Performance Products. We’re incredibly proud to form the Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team!
Vor Highlights Wade Simmons' Pipedream Built on the projections of the future and a fondness of the past, this is a story of Wade Simmons’ Pipedream.
Highlights

Wade Simmons' Pipedream

December 05, 2017

Wade Simmons has been in the free ride game since the beginning. His mark has been left on our sport through an extensive catalogue of images and video segments, showcasing his creative ability to conquer lines with unmistakable style. Simply put, Wade’s career has been driven by his desire to do something different. While watching the archived footage of himself riding in The Moment, he couldn’t help but get nostalgic on the bikes that helped make his career.

Bikes like the Pipeline, Switch, RMX, RM7, and RM9 were the tools of Wade’s trade. To him, these were the bikes that had soul. The “Thrust Link”, “NE 3”, and “3D Link” were some of the iconic technologies that helped make these bikes special. This was at a time where adding linkage plates to everything was the obvious solution. 

Wade is what we call an “ideas man.” Fueled by Wade’s creativity, Rocky Mountain Bicycles decided to build a very special bike, founded on nostalgia and designed to modern day standards. Tapping into some of his old favourite lines, this is a story of Wade Simmons’ Pipedream.
 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Gussets and linkage plates were an iconic look of the early 2000's. Riders like Wade were beginning to push mountain biking in a new direction, and the frame designs were changing to meet their demands. From 49mm straight head tubes to adding extra gussets for flair, the Pipedream embodies the renegade spirit of freeride.
 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Many of the early Rocky Mountain freeride bikes had a feature that allowed you to mount the rear shock in 3 different locations. This was known as "NE 3", and required 2 linkage plates on either side of the shock with a cross-brace to stiffen everything torsionally. While having a bit of fun with cross-bracing designs, the NE 3 Man was born.
 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

The 3D Link was a CNC'd feature on our full suspension bikes of the late 90's and early 2000's. Platforms like the Element, Edge, and Slayer all had versions of the 3D Link, which made it a natural addition to Wade's Pipedream.
 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

The Rocky Mountain Bicycles Development Centre is located at the foot of Vancouver's North Shore mountains and is home base for all of our product development. It's here that we weld our prototype frames, test new ideas, and fine tune the details. Longtime Rocky Mountain Bicycles welder, Al Kowalchuk worked on this custom project, delivering an incredible finished product.
 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

Wade Simmons Pipedream

 

Wade Simmons Pipedream

The Godfather of Freeride, Wade Simmons.

Rocky Mountain is proud to have been involved with the feature film, The Moment. We would also like to say a huge Thank You to Wade Simmons for his continued inspiration and dedication to freeride mountain biking.

Presented by Rocky Mountain Bicycles
Featuring Wade Simmons' Pipedream
 

PIPEDREAM
Frame Development & Design by Tom Ferenc, Lyle Vallie, Joe Kerekes, and James Mallion
Welding by Al Kowalchuk
Frame Preparation by Billy Chang
Paint by Harald Strasser at Toxik Design Laboratory

MUSIC
Magic Unfolding by Big Score Audio &
Voytek by The Heavy Eyes
All rights reserved. Used with permission.

FILM
A Film by Scott Secco
Featuring Wade Simmons
Produced by Stephen Matthews
Guest Appearances by Darcy Turenne and Rocky Mountain Bicycles staff
Sound Design by Keith White Audio
Typography by Mike Taylor

Archived footage by Todd Fiander, Christian Begin, Bjorn Enga, Darcy Wittenburg, and Jorli Ricker
Photography by Margus Riga

Special Thanks to Fox Suspension, Race Face, and Shimano

Zurück Highlights Resolutions So, what does it take to race hard plus earn an Economics or Kinesiology degree in the off season? Teamwork and resilience. The Rocky Mountain/7mesh riders know that success means more than lung capacity and enlarged quads. It’s a life balance only helped further by sticking together, and shaming each other about eating cookies.
Vor Highlights Shift in Perspective From the first time that you rolled past the end of the driveway, to the most recent ride on your favourite singletrack trail. The evolution of how you ride will change, but your love for the ride never should. Wade Simmons and Jesse Melamed are generational masters of our sport and are driven to push their own limits using new technologies to help ride trails in a new light. 
Highlights

Shift in Perspective

October 30, 2017

The freedom that comes from riding two wheels is like no other. From the first time that you rolled past the end of the driveway, to the most recent ride on your favourite singletrack trail. The evolution of how you ride will change, but your love for the ride never should. Wade Simmons and Jesse Melamed are generational masters of our sport and are driven to push their own limits using new technologies to help ride trails in a new light. 

www.bikes.com pipeline

"My motivation in mountain biking has always been to find creative lines and link uber-tech sections with fluidity. Having up to this point ridden 2.3–2.5 tires for 20+ years, I know the limitations. Now with the addition of the plus tire, I find my line choices evolving and that’s awesome to me!" —Wade Simmons

www.bikes.com pipeline
Creativity has always kept things fresh for Simmons. On the trail, he makes things happen that simply shouldn’t be possible, all while navigating extremely technical terrain with ease. He’s always been this way. Looking back at his segment in “Shift,” a breakout role for a much younger Godfather, it’s always been about pushing the boundaries of what’s possible.
www.bikes.com pipeline

It’s become apparent to me that the big advantage of running plus tires is the ability to maintain momentum and speed over rough terrain. The tires eat rough for breakfast! It can be a bit more finicky dialing in the tire pressure, but once you find the right balance, it's game on."—Wade Simmons

www.bikes.com pipeline

Jesse is laser-focused, and his race results against the World’s fastest are proof. He knows when to go for it, and anyone who’s ridden with Jesse will attest that he’s all-in once his tires hit the trail. Commitment is in his character, and being able to unlock and tap into unconventional lines has set him apart at the EWS and back home in Whistler.

"Running plus tires is great for reminding me there is more than one way to see a trail. It opens my mind to what’s possible and helps me visualize the different lines when practicing for an EWS race.”—Jesse Melamed

www.bikes.com pipeline

"Riding the all-new Pipeline is like riding any new bike, it's fun and exciting! I like to jump around and play with the trail, and the Pipeline lets me get away with landing in even the roughest sections and calling it a “landing”. Every time I get away with riding a stupid line, it motivates me to find another one. It's my favorite way to ride a bike, and a trail." —Jesse Melamed

www.bikes.com pipeline
The all-new Pipeline has 140mm of rear travel, 10mm more than the previous version. Being able to fine-tune the geometry and rear suspension of the bike is made possible by the Ride-9 Adjustment System embedded on the link. Jesse, who is known for charging hard and as fast as possible, has his Ride-9 set to Position 1 which is the slackest and most progressive setting. Wade, who loves a supple top end and a bit more linear feeling suspension, prefers his Pipeline in Position 3.

"Jesse shreds, I love riding with that guy! He puts a smile on my face because he reminds me of myself when I was younger; just bouncing around on his bike trying stupid things. He’s who I would consider being a “true” mountain biker, someone who enjoys all aspects of riding. When we ride together we constantly challenge each other, and session sketchy features and fool around... this is what mountain biking is all about!" —Wade Simmons

 

Presented by Rocky Mountain Bicycles
Featuring the all-new Pipeline

A Film by Max Berkowitz
Featuring Wade Simmons & Jesse Melamed
Edited by Max Berkowitz
Typography by Mike Taylor
Photography by Robin O’Neill

Zurück Highlights Wade Simmons' Pipedream Built on the projections of the future and a fondness of the past, this is a story of Wade Simmons’ Pipedream.
Vor Highlights In the Valley of the Sun Stretching through high mountain meadows and down deep winding valleys, Thomas Vanderham and Sam Schultz set out with their sights set on singletrack.
Highlights

In the Valley of the Sun

October 24, 2017

 

Stretching through high mountain meadows and down deep winding valleys, the trails of Sun Valley, Idaho are absolutely world class. The trails themselves hold a special feeling, built from the legacy of pioneers and visionaries exploring the region. Rocky Mountain Bicycles’ athletes, Thomas Vanderham and Sam Schultz, set out with their sights set on singletrack, tapping into their instinct for adventure.

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

"Spending a week exploring Sun Valley with Sam Schultz on the new Rocky Mountain Instinct was somewhat of a blur. Not just because chasing an Olympian up mountains at altitude is tough business, but because I quickly realized that there's a lot more to Sun Valley than the picture perfect single track it’s famous for.” - Thomas Vanderham

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

Mining, farming, and tourism have swept through Blaine County to meet the changing demands of passing decades. Adaptation and perseverance has kept Sun Valley alive, and forward thinking has led to developments such as the world’s first chairlift in 1936. Connecting with the area in a more traditional sense, American legends like Ernest Hemmingway lived out his life here, hunting and exploring the Wood River Valley, with an inspired take on the natural surroundings.

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

"Even after we rode some of the local classics, shredded new purpose-built singletrack, and climbed into the alpine to stay in a local piece of mountain history, it felt like we had just scratched the surface. I can't believe how much fun I've had riding the new Instinct. I was blown away by how effortlessly the bike carries speed, while improvements to the geometry and stiffness keep it nimble and stable. Next time I'll have to come for month, and I probably still won't run out of trails to ride." – Thomas Vanderham

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

The Pioneer Cabin was built by the Sun Valley Company in 1937 to help increase accessibility for skiers in the Pioneer Mountains. Ascending more than 23 relentless switchbacks through both wide-open grasslands and thick forest, the statement painted on the roof of the cabin, “the higher you get the higher you get,” is awfully matter of fact. The cabin builder, Averell Harriman, decided that the remote area around Sun Valley would be the perfect location for staging adventures, allowing people to spend more time exploring the backcountry. 

 

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

"Living in Missoula, MT, I have no shortage of pristine, buffed out singletrack right out my back door. The big difference in Sun Valley is the immense quantity of trail and the ability to ride right from town and get deep into the rugged mountains surrounding the valley. It had been awhile since my last visit, which was in 2012 and I managed to take the win at the XC National Championships.” – Sam Schultz

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

The world has become a smaller place, yet the opportunity for creative rides and unlikely trail connections are still very real in Sun Valley. In a combination of paper maps and downloadable apps, navigating legacy routes is a harmonious blend of historical and modern adventure.

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

"I’ve admired Thomas’ riding in videos for years, watching in awe while grinding on an indoor trainer all winter as a 16-year old racing fanatic. I was truly blown away to see his precision on the trail in real life. Every turn, technical feature, and jump was nailed with absolute perfection." - Sam Schultz 

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

" knew the trails were sweet and I was pumped to head there for more exploration on a bike designed for exactly the type of riding that has inspired me the most lately. The Instinct and I immediately felt like a match made in heaven. It was the perfect blend of Altitude and Element; fast feeling 29" wheels, plenty of travel to ride aggressively, rocket-like efficiency, all in a nimble package that is quite simply put, incredibly fun,” - Sam Schultz

In the Valley of the Sun with Thomas Vanderham amp Sam Schultz. Photo Margus Riga

"It is good to have an end to journey towards; but it is the journey that matters in the end.” - Ernest Hemingway. Ernest Hemingway was an American Novelist and Nobel Prize winner who moved to (and was buried in) Ketchum, Idaho.

Presented by Rocky Mountain Bicycles
Featuring the all-new Instinct

FILM
A Film by Liam Mullany
Cinematography by Liam Mullany & Andre Nutini
Featuring Thomas Vanderham & Sam Schultz
Edited by Liam Mullany & David Peacock 
Colour by Sam Gilling
Post Production Sound by Keith White Audio
Typography by Mike Taylor
Photography by Margus Riga

MUSIC
Denmark/ Van Gogh & Gone
Written and Performed by Psychadelic Porn Crumpets
All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Thanks to Gabe Schroeder, Sun Valley Resort

Zurück Highlights Shift in Perspective From the first time that you rolled past the end of the driveway, to the most recent ride on your favourite singletrack trail. The evolution of how you ride will change, but your love for the ride never should. Wade Simmons and Jesse Melamed are generational masters of our sport and are driven to push their own limits using new technologies to help ride trails in a new light. 
Vor News Das neue Pipeline Das brandneue Pipeline verspricht dank der Kombination aus Plus-Reifen und einem aggressiven Trail-Chassis auf technisch anspruchsvollem Gelände Fahrspaß pur.
Highlights

Powerplay: Wade Simmons im Süden Frankreichs

June 26, 2017

Text von Wade Simmons
Fotos von Matt Wragg

Ich war schon immer ein Vorreiter, wenn es ums Mountainbiken ging - sei es 1995 mit Freeriden oder 2017 mit E-Mountainbikes. Daher zögerte ich auch nicht lange, als mich Rocky Mountain fragte, ob ich beim neuen Powerplay Video mit dabei wäre. Mountainbiken ist mein Leben. Anstiege, Abfahrten, Cross-Country, Freeriden, E-MTBs - egal was, Hauptsache Biken. Es ist ein Teil von mir und ich freute mich darauf, Teil von etwas Neuem zu sein. Und vielleicht wollte ich auch einfach ein bisschen für Aufruhr sorgen.

Ich war bei der Entwicklung des ‘normalen’ Altitudes involviert und hatte auch mein Feedback zu den allerersten Prototypen des E-Mountainbikes gegeben. Das Ziel von diesem Projekt war jedoch, meinen ersten Eindruck von dem fertigen Serienmodell des neuen Altitude Powerplay einzufangen.

Über einem Bier fiel die Entscheidung, dass wir für diesen Trip nach Südfrankreich reisen wür den - warmes Klima, atemberaubende Trails und gutes (kohlenhydratreiches) Essen. Europa hat definitiv die Nase vorne, wenn es um E-MTBs geht und daher war dies die perfekte Möglichkeit, um die Rocky Mountain DNA im Land der Croissants und des Strava-Dopings zu testen.

Einen Nachtflug von Vancouver nach Nizza und ein paar Autostunden später kommen wir an unserem ersten Drehort an und treffen unsere Freunde Gaetan und Gaetan. Zum Glück hört einer der Beiden auf den Namen ‘Baguette’ (sein Nachname hört sich wie ‘du pain’ an und die Franzosen kennen keinen Spaß, wenn es um ihr Brot geht).  

Trotz des höllischen Jetlags kann ich einer kleinen Bikerunde einfach nicht widerstehen. „Die Stunde der Wahrheit”, sage ich zu Baguette.

Mich hat es einfach vom Hocker gehauen! Die Momentaufnahme im Film - absolut fertig und gleichzeitig ekstatisch - ist zu 100% echt. In diesem Moment merke ich, dass die Möglichkeiten mit einem E-Mountainbike wahrlich unendlich sind.

Am nächsten Tag stoßen wir auf diesen perfekt geshapten Wallride, der geradezu danach verlangt, gefahren zu werden. Davor gilt es jedoch eine technische und leicht ansteigende Anfahrt zu bewältigen.

„Das fahre ich,” sage ich in dem Moment, als ich es sehen, bin mir jedoch gleichzeitig nicht ganz sicher, dass es auch wirklich funktioniert. Ein paar Pedaltritte und ich carve das Ding im ersten Anlauf.

Was mich am meisten überrascht hat, ist, dass die zusätzliche Unterstützung überall neue Möglichkeiten eröffnet. Meine Fahrt war deutlich flowiger und ich konnte den Wallride mit sämtlichen anderen Features verbinden. Die Region macht einfach nur Spaß!

Dem Rat unseres Rocky Mountain EWS Teammanagers Lilian folgend, machen wir uns auf den Weg nach Toulon. Das Gelände ist extrem technisch mit einer grandiosen Aussicht aufs Mittelmeer. Kein Wunder, dass so viele der schnellsten Fahrer in dieser Gegend zuhause sind.

Und schon wieder haut mich dieses Bike vom Hocker; dieses mal geht es ums Klettern. Trotz meiner Vergangenheit als Cross-Country-Fahrer und meiner Vorliebe für technische Aufstiege habe ich nichts gegen das Aufheben der Schwerkraft. Das Powerplay macht genau das, und so habe ich in kürzester Zeit die Vorteile des zusätzlichen Flows und mehr Geschwindigkeit - selbst in schwierigsten Passagen - schätzen gelernt.

Immer schön die Augen auf den Trail richten und bloß nicht die Kurve vergeigen! Jetzt aber im Ernst - nicht aus der Kurve fliegen.

Ich bin mir durchaus bewusst, welches Glück ich habe, mit meinem Bike die Welt zu bereisen, doch manchmal weckt einen die harte Realität. Jeden Morgen um 4 Uhr früh aus dem Bett (ist 4 Uhr überhaupt schon Morgen?)  - anmutig wie ein kurzsichtiger, alter Ziegenbock - nur um das beste Licht für unseren Dreh zu erwischen.

„Keine Ahnung, ob das heute was wird”, sagt Brian, unser Produzent, Flöhe-Hüter und Schwarzmaler. Und während wir uns ums Frühstück kümmern,  verschlingt uns eine Nebelwand - hatte ich schon erwähnt, dass die Franzosen bei Brot keine Kompromisse eingehen?

Unser Produktionsteam macht sich Sorgen, dass es mit dem Videodreh dank des dichten Nebels nichts mehr wird, aber wenn wir schon mal hier sind…

Schwein gehabt! Der Nebel lichtet sich und spielt um die schroffen Felswände der Küste und offenbart uns einen unvergesslichen eindrucksvollen Sonnenaufgang.

Vergiss das Bike! Der Moment, als wir uns oberhalb der von Nebel durchzogenen Ruinen an die Abfahrt machten, war fast schon surreal. Was dann folgt, ist einer der besten Bike Tage, den ich seit langem hatte.

Das Video haben wir noch am Abend geschnitten. Wenn, wie bei diesem Dreh alles nach Plan und wie erhofft gelaufen ist, kann man sich eine gewisse Neugier auf das Endprodukt nicht verkneifen. An einem der vielen Strandkioske wurde gefeiert und über die gute Zeit und neue Horizonte sinniert.

Dieser Trip lässt Mountainbiken für mich in einem anderen Licht erstrahlen. Wir befinden uns in einem Paradigmenwechsel und haben bisher nur die Spitze des Eisbergs dessen gesehen, was möglich ist. Während dieses Trips ist mir klar geworden, dass ich das E-MTB nicht nur fahre, um meine Rides einfacher zu machen, vielmehr eröffnen E-MTBs komplett neue Möglichkeiten, die mit einem herkömmlichen Bike gar nicht machbar wären. So lerne ich auf meine alten Tage doch noch neue Tricks, finde neue Lines auf alten Trails, und habe dabei jede Menge Spaß. Ich kann es kaum erwarten zu sehen, wohin uns dieser Trend führt!

——

Fahre mehr, schneller, weiter. Das Altitude Powerplay ist ein E-MTB mit den Fahrqualitäten eines herkömmlichen Bikes. Das Altitude Powerplay verbindet innovativen Antrieb mit einem aggressiven Trailbike und eröffnet somit buchstäblich neue Wege und Möglichkeiten. Altitude Powerplay ist nur in ausgewählten europäischen Märkten erhältlich.

 

Video von Liam Mullany
Zusätzliches Filmmaterial von Gaetan Riou
Geschnitten von David Peacock & Liam Mullany
Produziert von Brian Park
Sound von Keith White Audio
Fotografie von Matt Wragg
Besonderen Dank an Fred Glo, Lilian Georges, Edgar Martins, Tribe Sport Group, Gaetan Riou, Sarah Tatine & Gaetan Dupin

 
“Omar”
Performed by Bayonne
Courtesy of Mom + Pop
By Arrangement with Hidden Track Music
open.spotify.com/track/54f36LcrbW4X9XPtdBZr3N
 
Zurück News Das neue Instinct und Instinct BC Edition Fahrstabil und aggressiv, das Instinct ist unser vielseitigstes Trail Bike.
Vor News Das neue Altitude Powerplay Wir sind stolz ein E-Mountainbike mit komplett integriertem, elektrischem Antriebssystem vorstellen zu dürfen, dass das legendäre Handling und die Fahreigenschaften unseres Altitudes besitzt, jedoch mit einem kraftvollen und kompakten Motor versehen ist. Parallel zur neue Powerplay™ Antriebseinheit haben wir einen passenden Rahmen entwickelt und mit super kurzen Kettenstreben, optimierter Federungskinematik, extrem niedrigen Schwerpunkt und die besten Drehmoment in seiner Klasse versehen.
Highlights

Fourtified

May 14, 2017

The four horsemen. 4x4s. Four leafed clovers. Four letter words. Fourtified. Wade Simmons, Remi Gauvin, Vaea Verbeeck, and Carson Storch take their new Altitudes to the four corners of the earth.

Los Angeles, California
Words & riding: Wade Simmons
Photos: Brian Vernor

We've had a winter for the record books up in BC this year. Great for skiing, not so much for riding. I'm twitchier than a cornered housecat when I can't ride, so I jumped at the opportunity to do some warm-weather shredding down in the Los Angeles area on the new Altitude.

Pro tip: 4am is a good time to head out the door if you want to beat LA traffic.

LA, I reckon, wouldn't be on most peoples hit-list for a great riding destination. Myself included. Being the largest city on the western US seaboard, and having the nation's worst traffic, I was starting to wonder why the hell we were going to LA in the first place. Could we escape the city and do the new bike justice? Our photographer and man-on-the-scene Brian Vernor picked us up from the airport, and within the hour he was easing my concerns over mindblowing tacos and coffee-infused horchata. He promised the riding would be as good as the food.

Just in case Vernor was full of shit, I had some ideas up my sleeve too. I've been in the area a few times in my 20 years of hunting around for lines to film, and I've left a few nugs untouched. I was looking forward to possibly hitting them up on this trip.

To be honest, my fears were 100% unfounded. The riding in the LA area proved to be plentiful and diverse. We rode flowy urban singletrack, loose subalpine trails, freshly built jumps and berms, and a few big mountain lines. Pretty much a mountain bike smorgasbord, all within an hours drive from the Hollywood Hotel where we stayed. Maybe the riding is even better than the food...

Derby, Tasmania
Words & riding: Remi Gauvin
Photos: Dave Trumpore

The second round of the Enduro World Series brought the Rally Team to Derby, Tazmania. Built only three years ago, we were racing on 7 wildly varying stages across 57 kilometers with 1700 meters of climbing.

Mild sunny weather during practice gave way to rain on race day, throwing many challenging trails into pure chaos. Stage two held the much-feared meter-wide crack on Detonate, with multiple riders being chewed up inside and spit out into the rocks below, but the real challenge of the race was at the top of stage 4 where rain washed the supporting dirt out of a high speed rock garden filled with holes.

I'd been working hard to adjust to the changing conditions over the race, and as the day wore on I started feeling stronger—bagging a 4th place finish on stage six, it was pretty fast and constant high speeds, which suit my style. Stage 7 was a short woods section with a sprint to the finish. It was kind of like riding the trails of the North Shore, which helped. It was kinda cold and miserable, and you didn’t want to be that dirty but you just keep going.

At the end of it all I fought my way up to 9th overall—finally achieving my goal of cracking the top 10 at an EWS. The Rally Team took the team win, with the whole crew putting up strong results. This puts us all in a place where we're happy, but getting fired up for the next round!

Sunshine Coast, British Columbia
Words & riding: Vaea Verbeeck
Photos: Margus Riga

With the snowline down to sea level in Vancouver, I wanted to be able to get on the gas and see how the new bike would respond. The obvious choice was the Sunshine Coast. It has unreal riding conditions almost year-round, and the Coast Gravity park has some of my favourite trails ever.

I love it there. The people, the ambiance, beautiful Sechelt, they all make it a destination of choice. [although for some reason all of Sechelt uses Papyrus font... what gives? -Ed.] CGP is one of the places that helps me feel good about going fast on the bike again during the off season. The guys work tirelessly to keep their trails impeccable, and it offers a perfect variation from the tech of the North Shore.

We had a tight weather window to shoot before a major system moved in, we were excited to get a few clear days. It was beautiful and dry, but oh so cold! With the cold came trails like glass covered in pine needles—always trying to throw me on my head! The perfectly sculpted corners had this incredible layer of hoarfrost that made for eerie noises and a surreal ride feel. I'm not sure if I had too much grip or not enough.

Despite being intimidated to send it into some of the natural terrain with challenging conditions, I quickly got used to the new whip and started opening up the throttle. Bluebird days, CGP's keys in my hand, untouched berms to myself, and sending it on my new favourite bike—this was definitely the highlight of my off season, and I quickly forgot about the sub-zero temperatures.

I'm thankful for those few days of shredding, and I'm going to keep the good times rolling through the season!

Queenstown, New Zealand
Words & riding: Carson Storch
Photos: Tyler Roemer

Riding the Fernhill Loop above Queenstown was epic every time. It has a little bit of everything. Climbing up through a mix of alpine terrain, going into native forest with quick descents here and there. You end up at the McGazza memorial, pay your respects to the big man, then drop into salmon run- which is a mix of steep techy trail, and loam. I would say this bike was made for that loop.

I also rode Skyline bike park in Queenstown quite a bit, so I had it set up in the slackest RIDE-9 position. The suspension was set up fairly stiff with slow rebound. When I 450'ed that hip in the bike park, it was completely comfortable! It felt like I was on a slopestyle bike. Then when I got back to ripping trail, it was snappy and responsive, while taking some pretty big impacts with ease. All around ripping bike.

New Zealand is my favourite place in the world, so having the chance to go my favourite place and test out the new Altitude was a dream come true.

Presented by Rocky Mountain Bicycles
Featuring the new Altitude
Directed by Liam Mullany
Produced by Brian Park
Featuring Wade Simmons, Rémi Gauvin, Vaea Verbeeck & Carson Storch
Filmed by Liam Mullany, Harrison Mendel & John Parkin
Edited by Liam Mullany
Colour by Sam Gilling
Post Production Sound by Keith White Audio
Original Music by Thinnen

Zurück News Das neue Altitude Powerplay Wir sind stolz ein E-Mountainbike mit komplett integriertem, elektrischem Antriebssystem vorstellen zu dürfen, dass das legendäre Handling und die Fahreigenschaften unseres Altitudes besitzt, jedoch mit einem kraftvollen und kompakten Motor versehen ist. Parallel zur neue Powerplay™ Antriebseinheit haben wir einen passenden Rahmen entwickelt und mit super kurzen Kettenstreben, optimierter Federungskinematik, extrem niedrigen Schwerpunkt und die besten Drehmoment in seiner Klasse versehen.
Vor News RMB x 7Mesh: Coastal Collaboration For the 2017 season we are launching the Coastal Collaboration with 7mesh Industries! The tightly focused collection features core 7mesh garments with Rocky Mountain design elements.
Highlights

Gullyver's Travels: Ausgabe eins

January 13, 2017
Text: Geoff Gulevich
Video Damien Vergez

Als gesponsorter Athlet war ich für die diversen Wettbewerbe zwar schon in vielen Ecken diesen Welt unterwegs, habe jedoch selten mehr als die kleinen Bergdörfer gesehen, in denen die Events normalerweise stattfinden. Und je länger ich dabei bin, desto mehr zieht es mich raus aus dieser Blase, um die Welt außerhalb davon zu entdecken. Gully’vers Reisen ist mein Aufruf an Alle, diese extra Schritte zu wagen und neue Orte kennenzulernen.

In dieser ersten Ausgabe geht es in die Französischen Alpen, zusammen mit meinem Freund und Rocky Mountain Team Kollegen, Tito Tomasi. Als Weltenbummler und phänomenaler Mountainbiker war Tito mit seinem Bike schon in den entlegensten Regionen dieser Welt unterwegs. Sein Lebensmotto lautet “Vive la vie” (Lebe das Leben), und genau das hatten wir vor.

Unsere Mission began in dem kleinen Dorf Abriès. Wir strampelten bergauf bis die Steigung es nicht mehr zuließ und wir die Bikes schieben mussten. So erreichten wir etwas später unser Tagesziel, den Malrief See auf 2430m, an dessen Ufer wir unsere Zelte für die Nacht aufschlugen. Kurze Zeit später, pünktlich zum Sonnenuntergang, standen die Zelte, ein kleines Lagerfeuer loderte und wir begannen uns unsere Bäuche Stilecht mit Bier, Krustenbrot, Bauernschinken und diversen Käsesorten vollzustopfen - immerhin waren wir in Frankreich.
 
 
 

Der nächste morgen begann sehr früh, gefolgt von einer vier Stunden Wanderung mit den Bikes auf dem Rücken. Am schneebedeckten Gipfel von Grand Glaiza angekommen, ließ uns das Panorama jedoch jegliche Qualen vergessen. Wir genossen die spektakuläre Aussicht bevor wir uns an die 3.300 Höhenmeter Abfahrt zurück ins Tal machten.

Zurück in Abriès trennten sich unsere Wege. Tito hatte eine weitere Reise geplant und ich wollte unbedingt noch in den Bikepark von Chatel, um nach dieser langen Tour ein wenig die Sau raus zu lassen. Kein Wunder, dass die Locals hier alles Schredder sind, der Park bietet jede Menge Trails mit gutem Flow und ansehnlichen Jumps.

Nach zwei Tagen Höhentraining und fremden Bikeparks war es Zeit die Heimreise anzutreten. Ein großes Dankeschön geht an Tito, der sich auch als Tourguide nicht verstecken muss, und an den Bikepark Chatel für die unübertreffbare Gastfreundlichkeit.

Bis zum nächsten Mal. Wir sehen uns auf den Trails.

— Gully

Zurück News Four generations of freeride: the 2017 Rocky Mountain team Wade Simmons, Thomas Vanderham, and Geoff Gulevich join the returning Carson Storch to round out our freeride program.
Vor News Das Slayer erntet Bestnoten bei der Bibel aller Bike Tests “Das Slayer läutet eine neue Ära im All-Mountain Bereich ein und bringt Fahrer weiter denn je.” — Bike Magazine
Highlights

Elemente des Erfolgs

November 27, 2016

Von allen Events, auf denen wir Jahr für Jahr vertreten sind, macht uns keines stolzer als das BC Bike Race. Bei diesem sieben Tage dauernden Etappenrennen erleben Fahrer aus der ganzen Welt eine Kostprobe unserer besten Trails. Auf dieser Tour entlang der zerklüfteten Küste von British Columbia kommen die Teilnehmer in den Genuss einiger der weltweit anspruchsvollsten XC-Singletrails, während sie zwischen Pazifik und den Coastal Mountains zelten.

Das 10-jährige Jubiläum des BC Bike Race in diesem Jahr war der perfekte Anlass, die XC-Marathon Eigenschaften unseres neu überarbeiteten Elements unter Realbedingungen zu testen. Mensch und Maschine werden während des siebentägigen Rennens bis zum absoluten Limit beansprucht. Das Wetter war durchwachsen, die Trails aggressiv; perfekte Bedingungen also, um unser Element auf den Prüfstand zu schicken.

Unser Fahrer: Quinn Moberg, 22 Jahre jung aus Squamish, BC. Er ist schon seit einiger Zeit Teil unseres Teams und es ist erstaunlich, mit zu verfolgen, wie er sich binnen weniger Jahre zu einer festen Größe in der XC-Welt entwickelt hat. Nicht verwunderlich also, dass er sich hohe Ziele für das diesjährige BC Bike Race gesteckt hat.

Bike Check — Quinn Moberg

“BCBR ist eines der härtesten XC-Rennen überhaupt. Dieses Jahr war es während der gesamten Zeit außerdem ungewöhnlich nass und kalt. Trotz alledem bin ich ohne technische Defekte durch das Rennen gekommen. Ich glaube, das sagt einiges über die Qualität des Bikes aus.“

“Der neue Rahmen macht einen großen Unterschied. Es vermittelt Selbstvertrauen pur in technischen Passagen und besitzt gleichzeitig effizientere Klettereigenschaften. Bei diesem Rahmen habe ich deshalb bewusst auf einen Lockout-Remote-Hebel verzichtet, da es einfach keinen großen Unterschied mehr macht, den Dämpfer zu blockieren. Neben dem neuen Rahmen war ich außerdem zum ersten Mal mit der neuen Shimano Di2 Schaltung unterwegs. Die elektronische Schaltung arbeitet intuitiv und ultra-schnell, was besonders auf unbekannten Trails von Vorteil ist.“ Quinn Moberg

  • Rahmen: Element 999 RSL T.O. (Large, Quinn ist 5’11” bzw. 1,80m)
  • Setup: Neutrale RIDE-9™ Position
  • Dämpfer: Fox Float DPS Factory (100mm, ohne Remote-Hebel)
  • Federgabel: Fox 34 Factory (120mm)
  • Schaltwerk: Shimano XT Di2
  • Kurbel: Shimano XTR
  • Bremsen: Shimano XTR Race
  • Felgen: Stan’s NoTubes Valor
  • Reifen: Maxxis Ikon 2.2 EXO TR 3C (23 psi bzw. 1,6 bar vorne, 24 psi bzw. 1,7 bar hinten)
  • Lenker: Race Face Next 35mm (10mm rise, auf 740mm gekürzt)
  • Vorbau: Race Face Turbine 35mm (80mm)
  • Griffe: Race Face Half Nelson
  • Sattel: WTB Silverado Carbon
  • Sattelstütze: Race Face Turbine dropper post (100mm)
  • Pedale: Shimano XTR Race
  • Gewicht: 23lb bzw. 10,4 kg

Etappe 6: Squamish, präsentiert von Shimano

Die Squamish-Etappe ist ein echter Favorit unter den Teilnehmern. Von unberührten, steilen und technisch anspruchsvollen Singletrails bis hin zu flowigen Jumplines - es gibt zahllose Gründe dafür, dass diese Strecke bei vielen ganz oben auf der To-Do Liste steht. Doch mit fünf vorhergegangenen Etappen in den Beinen kann diese Strecke auch erfahrene Rider in die Schranken weisen.

  • Distanz: 53 km / 33 miles
  • Höhenmeter: 1,944 m / 6378 ft
  • Durchschnittliche Zeit: 4 hours 57 minutes
  • Schnellste Zeit: 2 hours 43 minutes

Bereits einen Etappensieg in der Tasche, rückte für Quinn ein Platz auf dem Siegertreppchen auf seiner Hausstrecke in greifbare Nähe. Doch die harte Konkurrenz, die sich teilweise zusammengeschlossen hatte, um dem jungen Lokalmatador die Chancen auf den Gesamtsieg zu mindern, sollte dieses Ziel zu einer echten Herausforderung machen.

“Ich bin mit einer Zwei-Schritte-vor-einen-Schritt-zurück Taktik in Squamish angetreten. Ich wusste, dass mir die Konkurrenz auf den Downhill Passagen dank des neuen Bikes und meines Heimvorteils nicht hinterherkommen würde. Um meinen Kontrahenten nicht die Ideallinie zu verraten, habe ich kurz vor der ersten Abfahrt alles gegeben und einen kleinen Vorsprung herausgefahren. Mit dieser Taktik konnte ich meinen Vorsprung auf den Abfahrten wie geplant weiter ausbauen und so meine Kräfte für die Anstiege besser einteilen, während die Anderen alles geben mussten, um mich einzuholen.“ Quinn Moberg
 

Quinn’s derart konsequente Umsetzung seiner Taktik ist eher untypisch für Athleten seines Jahrgangs, doch mit seiner Strategie auf den Abfahrten, die er wie kein Zweiter kennt, konnte er einen Vorsprung herausfahren. Und tatsächlich gelang es ihm noch vor Beginn der ersten Abfahrt, seine Konkurrenten abzuschütteln und so aufgrund kleiner Fahrfehler der anderen Fahrer seinen Vorsprung weiter auszubauen.

Moberg übernahm damit früh die Führung, die er im weiteren Verlauf des Rennens sogar auf einige Minuten ausbauen konnte. Mit hochgerissen Armen überquerte er dann jubelnd als Erster die Ziellinie. Die 55 km Etappe ist der Favorit aller Teilnehmer und hier zu gewinnen wie ein Ritterschlag.

10 Jahre

Dass BCBR bereits sein 10. Jubiläum feiert, hat uns auch dazu bewegt, über unsere Herkunft nachzudenken. Das Event, die Trails und unsere Bikes haben sich alle parallel entwickelt. Die Bikes, die wir heute fahren, ausgestattet mit fortschrittlichen Federungen, Vario-Stützen und einer aggressiven Trail Geometrie, haben nichts mehr mit den ursprünglichen Bikes zu tun. Gleichzeitig haben sich die Trails verändert, gebaut von engagierten Vereinen und rastlosen Trailbauern. Auch BCBR hat sich zu einem Event entwickelt, das, ursprünglich hauptsächlich auf Schotterstraßen ausgetragen, nun zu einem Großteil auf erlesenen Singletrails stattfindet, die als Meisterwerke ihrer Art gelten.

“Das BC Bike Race ist ein hartes, anspruchsvolles, siebentägiges Singletrail-Abenteuer. Während dieser Woche werden die Fahrer und ihre Bikes bis ans Limit gefordert. Die Besten Bikes für diese Herausforderung sind weder ultraleichte XC-Peitschen, noch hardcore Enduro-Hobel. Ich bin in diesem Jahr mit dem neuen Element angetreten. Es sticht gerade auf den technischen Singletrails heraus und bot trotz mehrerer Tage in anspruchsvollem Gelände eine Wahnsinns Performance. Ich bin in meiner Karriere schon auf vielen Bikes unterwegs gewesen, und dieses Bike ist ohne Zweifel ist das Beste, dass ich je gefahren bin.“Andreas Hestler, BC Bike Race

“Für mich ist es immer etwas Besonderes, Rennen auf meinen Heimstrecken zu absolvieren. Das Gemeinschaftsgefühl all der Menschen, die mich kennen und unterstützen, ist hier am stärksten. Ich gebe alles, um hier zu gewinnen, das ist sozusagen mein Teil des Deals. Die Leute hier jubeln für mich, helfen mir, leiten und motivieren mich. Zu gewinnen ist mein Beitrag, dieser Gemeinschaft etwas zurückzugeben.“ Quinn Moberg

Ein großes Dankeschön an die BCBR Crew, all die Trailbauer und die vielen Freiwilligen, die dieses Event überhaupt ermöglichen. Ein besonderes Dankeschön auch an Tristan Uhls grandiosen Schnurrbart, und Danke Andreas Hestler, unser internationales Sprachrohr. Danke an Manuel Weissenbacher, Andreas Hartmann, Greg Day, Sammi Runnels, Udo Bolts, Carsten Bresser, und all die anderen Athleten, die mit uns gefahren sind. Und natürlich Gratulation an Quinn Moberg, der zwei Etappen gewann und in der Gesamtwertung Platz 4 belegt.

Bis zum nächsten Jahr!

#lovetheride #elementsofvictory

Video: Mindspark Cinema

Fotografie: Margus Riga & Norma Ibarra

2017 Rocky Mountain Element

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Highlights

Shoulder Season Shred

October 27, 2016

Injuries are setbacks for athletes, but they can also bring opportunities to try different things. With Andréane recovered from a broken hand and me getting over a broken collarbone, we thought it would be fun to get out and do this bicycle thing together. No clock, less stress on our bodies, but all the fun.

We wanted to get out of Vancouver, and headed to Pemberton to explore the meadows around Tenquille Lake. We got Thomas Vanderham to join us, as well as photographer Margus Riga. A freeride legend, an enduro racer, and a downhill racer, all going for a trail ride. Quite the crew!

I have very little experience in backcountry riding. It wasn’t until Brian, the Rocky Mountain marketing guy, lent me his PLB (locator beacon) that it hit home—we definitely weren’t back in the bike park. However, Thomas and Margus both have tons of backcountry experience, and we all felt at ease going into the ride.

It was a nice day as we started in on the climbs for the day. A rain cloud hit us during the hike-a-bike section but the warm sun was poking through. The flies kept our snack breaks short.

We came to a trail intersection. Either head straight into the trail we had planned on shooting, or go up another 2km to reach Tenquille Lake. Margus thought the cabin up top would be a pretty sweet spot for part of the shoot. We all wanted to see the lake and cabin up in the alpine, so we changed the plan and headed up.

We came to the open area between two massive rocky ridges and started crossing. The snow was still abundant so we had to start walking our bikes. After a little while ALN looked down to her GPS and noticed we had gone past the 2km mark and there was no sight of a lake or cabin. It seemed pretty straightforward to stumble upon that lake as we were in an open valley, yet there was definitely no lake in sight. It was a bit of a head scratcher, and eventually we had to turn around.
 
 
Ever heard of the expression “getting Riga’d”? As we were backtracking in the snow, Thomas explained to ALN and I that we had just gotten Riga’d. Apparently we’re not the first to get lost while on a shoot with Margus Riga. Feels like we’re part of a club now.
 

I thought our feet couldn’t have gotten any more wet until we hit a river crossing, but as soon as things headed downhill I forgot about my soaked feet. I’m not sure if it was because the technical riding was keeping them warm or because they were frozen numb.

The trail wove through all sorts of natural scenery. The top of the trail was rocky and shaley, before making its way through a burn from a forest fire a few years ago. Eerie and beautiful.

The lower we got, the greener our surroundings became. By the end of it, the trail was so overgrown you couldn’t see 20 feet ahead, or your feet for that matter. That didn’t stop us from keeping our speed—it just spiced things up when blindly catching loose rocks beneath.

We finished the day at a perfect camp spot on Lillooet Lake. Food and drink are always more enjoyable after a day like this.

The next morning we had hopes of checking out a trail up Duffy Lake Road. We’d done some researching on the trail access and Margus had been in that area some 20 years ago, so it would be easy to find. Right?

This was getting Riga’d 2.0. We drove around endless fire roads that had undoubtedly changed over the years of logging. We went a little further, a little more, and some more. The wide access roads became double-tracks, and then stopped entirely.

 

We returned to town to regroup. Some things happen for a reason, and as soon as we hit the paved road again, we got smashed by a torrential downpour. Not the “grit-your-teeth-and-bear-it” kind of rain, but the “oh-shit-this-is-bad-and-I-have-hypothermia” kind of rain. We were decently prepared, but if we’d been on that trail it would have been a bad scene.

The haphazardly laid plans of mice and men were saved by the good old Pemby trail network! Our bud Dylan Forbes swung by to join us for a few laps, and we were all fired up to ride some of the best trails in the lower mainland.

This wouldn’t have been a Margus Riga trip without getting a little Riga’d. Oh! And I should mention that ALN checked her GPS and could see Tenquille lake on the map! It was there, just past where we had stopped and turned around. Next time…

 

Words by Vaea Verbeeck

Photos by Margus Riga

Additional photos by Brian Park & Thomas Vanderham

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Zurück News Get Kitted, So Kitted With the holidays coming and plenty of riding still left in 2016, it's the perfect time to offer up some huge discounts on apparel. At least 30% off all the kit you need!
Vor News Trail Journal: Volume One Die erste Ausgabe unseres Trail Journals widmen wir dem Spaß, auf zwei Rädern durch den Dreck zu rollen. 70 Seiten unserer besten Geschichten, Bilder, Bikes und Persönlichkeiten aus 35 Jahren Rocky Mountain.

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