Geoff Gulevich

News

Introducing the new Instinct and Instinct BC Edition

August 23, 2017

Stable and aggressive, the Instinct is our most versatile trail bike.

With 29" wheels and a wide range of RIDE-9™ adjustments, the all new Instinct is available in both carbon and alloy models. An all-new frame for 2018 pushes the rear travel to 140mm, increasing stiffness and tweaking the suspension kinematics. Despite the increase in travel, the new frame has noticeably more efficient pedaling, with better small-bump sensitivity and a host of next-generation features. 

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In the same family, born in BC, we’ve turned the Instinct BC Edition into an aggressive trail monster.

Designed with an optimized link and long stroke shock that provide 155mm of rear travel and ultra-aggressive geometry, we’ve kitted out the Instinct BC Edition with wide bars, big tires, ultra-stiff wheels, and more capable suspension. It smashes all mountain lines, rails corners, and plows over everything in sight, while displaying all the climbing efficiency that makes the Instinct a crowd favourite.

Please head to your local Rocky Mountain Bicycles Dealer to order your new Instinct or Instinct BC Edition.

“I can't believe how much fun I've had riding the new Instinct. I was blown away by how effortlessly the bike carries speed, while improvements to the geometry and stiffness keep it nimble and stable. The Instinct has handled every type of terrain I've thrown at it and even opened up new lines for me on trails I've been riding for over a decade." - Thomas Vanderham

INSTINCT
Intended Use
: Trail
Wheel Size: 29" (27.5+ ready)
Front Travel: 140mm
Rear Travel: 140mm

INSTINCT BC EDITION
Intended Use
: Aggressive Trail
Wheel Size: 29" (27.5+ ready)
Front Travel: 160mm
Rear Travel: 155mm

Improved suspension performance

We’ve increased overall progression and support at sag, while making small-bump performance even more sensitive. Higher anti-squat values dramatically improve pedaling efficiency.

Next generation features

Comprehensive evolutionary updates across the platform include features like tooled axles, singlesided bearing pivots, integrated “Spirit Guide” chainguide, boost spacing, and metric shock compatibility.

Updated RIDE-9™

Our RIDE-9™ system provides a wide range of geometry and suspension adjustability; it has been moved into the link for lighter, narrower packaging. Instinct BC Edition, with its increased travel, comes with a single mounting position in its link to provide the best balance of travel and geometry.

Progressive geometry

To add control and descending capability, we’ve increased reach, slackened the headtube angle, and lowered the bottom bracket. We’ve significantly shortened the chain stays to improve agility and used a moderately steep seat tube for efficient climbing performance.

 

Technical Details

  • Increased anti-squat for better pedaling efficiency
  • 29” Wide Trail and 27.5+ compatible
  • Max tire clearance is 29 x 2.6, and 27.5 x 2.8 (3.0 with low profile knobs)
  • Bearings at all pivots, including at lower shock mount (compatible with aftermarket shocks as well)
  • Blind pivots maximize heel clearance
  • Lighter, tooled rear axle
  • All Instinct models include the FSA extend-O-matic headset. The bike ships with a second (taller) headset bottom cup, which allows the rider to opt for 27.5+ wheels without negatively affecting handling, and no fork swap is required.
  • Improved cable management: large headtube ports, full shift housing, large downtube access port, and internal shift and brake housing within the front triangle
  • Future-proofed to be compatible with Di2, Fox Live, and a dropper post simultaneously
  • Seat-tube lengths have been adjusted to accommodate longer dropper posts at maximum insertion.
  • Chainstay and downtube protectors. *Due to production delays, the initial shipment of 2018 Pipelines will not include chainstay and downtube protectors. They will be shipped to shops as soon as they’re available. The October shipment will have them installed.
  • Integrated “Spirit Guide” chainguide, with 2-bolt ISCG05
  • BC Edition features a dedicated link delivering 155mm of travel and fixed geometry
  • 1x optimized design with wider main pivot
  • Lower standover height
  • Significantly stiffer thanks to one-piece seat stays, new envelope, and updated layup (47.7% more lateral stiffness)
  • Modern parts compatibility (boost spacing, metric shock lengths, post-mount 180mm brakes, etc.)
  • All sizes fit a water bottle in the front triangle, even with a reservoir shock
  • Sizes: S-XL
  • Weight:
    • Frame & shock: 5.09lb (2310g), size Medium
    • Frame & shock: 5.62lb (2550g), size Medium, Instinct BC Ed.
    • Protectors, chainguide, & axle: 0.57lb (260g)
    • Instinct Carbon 70 complete: 27.4lb (12.4kg), size Medium
    • Instinct Carbon 90 BC Edition complete: 29.5lb (13.4kg), size Medium

 

Please note:

We have a new naming convention In the interest of describing our lineup more clearly, we’ve updated our naming conventions. What used to be called Instinct 970 MSL is now Instinct Carbon 70, and what used to be called Instinct 950 is now Instinct Alloy 50. The Instinct still uses high-quality Smoothwall carbon and FORM alloy frames, and higher spec numbers still indicate higher end specs.

 
Riders: Geoff Gulevich and Thomas Vanderham
Photo: Margus Riga
Location: Whistler, BC

Riders: Geoff Gulevich and Thomas Vanderham
Photo: Margus Riga
Location: Whistler, BC
 
 
Riders: Geoff Gulevich and Thomas Vanderham
Photo: Margus Riga
Location: Whistler, BC
 
 
Riders: Geoff Gulevich and Thomas Vanderham
Photo: Anthony Smith
Location: Mt Barbour, BC
 

Limited quantities and sizes available from August 24th. General availability from mid to late October. Please head to your local Rocky Mountain dealer to pre-order. Regional availability may vary.

See the full line-up here with complete details.

 

Previous News Introducing the new Pipeline The all-new Pipeline combines the confidence of plus-sized tires in raw, technical terrain with an aggressive trail chassis.
Next Feature Powerplay: Wade Simmons in the South of France Wade Simmons heads to the South of France to document his first taste of the Altitude Powerplay eMTB.
News

Four generations of freeride: the 2017 Rocky Mountain team

March 07, 2017

We're excited to announce that Wade Simmons, Thomas Vanderham, and Geoff Gulevich have all renewed ties with Rocky Mountain for 2017. They join the returning Carson Storch to round out our freeride program. The team will ride the Slayer, Maiden, and Altitude—and Carson will get a custom slopestyle bike cooked up in our North Vancouver prototype shop.

Wade Simmons, the Godfather of freeride, said “I’ve been with Rocky Mountain over 20 years now, and I’m stoked to be continuing on the program. We’ve got some fun adventures planned and I’m looking forward to sending it into the coming years. I need to show these young punks a thing or two!”

Thomas Vanderham continues to push the boundaries of big mountain riding, with appearances at select FEST events and in several film projects on the horizon. His precision and focus have also made him invaluable to the Rocky Mountain engineering team, and he works closely with them to develop and refine our bikes.

Geoff Gulevich maintains his globetrotting ways, with plans to log a ton of airmiles in 2017—both on and off the bike. His “Gullyver’s Travels” series will take him off the beaten path, and hopefully not feature too much male nudity.

Returning this year is Carson Storch. The young American athlete had a breakout year in 2016, with a podium spot and best trick at Rampage, and we’re fired up to see what he has in store in 2017.

After a long and storied career at Rocky Mountain, Brett Tippie is moving on in 2017. The Director of Good Times has been an iconic member of our family, and his signature laugh and unparalleled stoke will be sorely missed. We wish you all the best in your future endeavours Tippie, and we’ll see you (or at least hear you) out on the trails!

Rocky Mountain helped usher in the birth of freeride, and we’re proud to have every generation of freeride represented on our team. They continue to push the sport and inspire people to get out on their bikes—we couldn’t ask for better ambassadors for our brand.

Love the Ride,

—Rocky Mountain Bicycles

Photos by Margus Riga, Paris Gore, and Ale Di Lullo.

Previous News The new Altitude is here Taking trail to new heights. Often imitated but never surpassed, the all-new Altitude pushes the envelope of what a modern trail bike is capable of.
Next Feature Gullyver's Travels: Episode One I've crisscrossed the globe as a competitor for many years, but I rarely ventured beyond the mountain resorts that contests are held in. As I get older, I've started pushing to escape the industry bubble and get off the beaten path more. — Gully
Feature

Gullyver's Travels: Episode One

January 13, 2017
Words by Geoff Gulevich
Video by Damien Vergez

I've crisscrossed the globe as a competitor for many years, but I rarely ventured beyond the mountain resorts that contests are held in. As I get older, I've started pushing to escape the industry bubble and get off the beaten path more. The premise behind Gullyver's Travels is to motivate everyone to step outside of their comfort zone and explore new places. 

Episode One takes place in the French Alps and features long time friend and Rocky Mountain teammate, Tito Tomasi. A world traveller who also happens to be a phenomenal mountain biker, Tito has ridden some of the most remote places on earth. His personal motto is vive la vie, and we intended to do just that.

Our mission began in the village of Abriès. We pedalled as long as we could, before the grade forced us to dismount and carry our bikes. We reached the Malrif Lakes, which sit at about 8,000 feet, and set up camp for the evening. Just before the sun dropped we got a fire going and filled our stomachs with beer, bread, meat, and cheese—we were in France after all.
 
 
 

The next morning, an early rise followed by four hours of carrying our bikes on our back was all made worth it when we arrived at the snow-covered summit of Grand Glaiza. After enjoying the spectacular views, we pointed our bikes down the 10,800 foot descent that lay in front of us.

Once back in town, Tito and I parted ways. He was off on another adventure and I was off to Bike Park Chatel for some big rig rippin'. It's no wonder why the Bike Park Chatel locals are all shredders, the park is filled with trails that have great flow and a number of sizeable features. 

After two days of racking up vertical, it was time to head home. A big thank you goes out to Tito for being an amazing tour guide, and to Bike Park Chatel. Their hospitality is always second to none.

Until next time, see you on the trail!

— Gully

Previous News Four generations of freeride: the 2017 Rocky Mountain team Wade Simmons, Thomas Vanderham, and Geoff Gulevich join the returning Carson Storch to round out our freeride program.
Next News Slayer earns top marks at the Bible of Bike Tests "The Slayer ushers in a new era of all-mountain bikes, taking riders farther than ever." — Bike Magazine
Feature

Dumbing Down the Shore

April 10, 2016

Wade Simmons finally speaks out on what he calls the "de-gnarification" of Vancouver's North Shore.

With apologies to Keyser Söze.

Featuring the new Rocky Mountain Pipeline
Starring Wade Simmons, Brett Tippie, Geoff Gulevich, Eric Lawrenuk, Andreas Hestler, and Todd "Digger" Fiander
Created by Union Co.
Produced by Brian Park
Thanks to the NSMBA for all their work
Photography by Margus Riga

Previous Feature Welcome to the Family Vaea Verbeeck We filmed this little shredit with Vaea last year. She's been part of the Rocky Mountain family for a while now, and she's chomping at the bit to get racing in Lenzerheide next month.
Next News Introducing the Pipeline The confidence of plus-sized tires in raw, technical terrain is now available in an aggressive trail chassis.
News

Win a Maiden with Bar Drag Bounty 4

March 01, 2016

We've partnered with Vital MTB to bring you the best Instagram contest ever. Here's how you can win a brand new Maiden Park:

  • Upload your best turn video to Instagram
  • Tag @vitalmtb, @rockymountainbicycles and #bardragbounty
  • That's it. You're entered and could win a Rocky Mountain Maiden Park!

Contest runs March 1 through March 31. Vital MTB and Rocky Mountain team riders will pick the final winner, announced by Vital on April 3. Contest open worldwide, where local regulations allow.

Best of luck!

Previous News Video: Carson Storch in Barcelona Our newest freeride team member crosses the pond for warmer temperatures and new spots. Good vibes in this film by Harrison Mendel.
Next News 2016 Rocky Mountain Backgrounds
Feature

2 Fat 2 Furious: A Fat Bike Freeride Film

January 29, 2016

We had way too much fun last year shooting our first fat bike freeride video, so we knew we had to do another this year. The goal of 2 Fat 2 Furious was to only ride things that would be harder or impossible on a regular bike. From waist-deep powder to drifty sled tracks to packed down jump lines, the boys achieved just that.

Geoff Gulevich, Wade Simmons, and Noah Brousseau got rad on their Blizzards all winter, and we're excited to show everyone the result.

"We were having fun ripping around on the snowmobile tracks but looking at all the pow chutes surrounding us it was only a matter of time before we were dropping in—we just had to figure out lines that were steep enough to stay afloat!" — Wade Simmons

The whole gang. Our only regret is that Ludacris was too busy to make it out.

Noah Brousseau found out that there are limits to float. Turns out.

Even the Godfather crashes now and then.

This was the first time any of the boys had hit a proper sized drop on a fat bike. Worked out better than expected!

"I was pretty confident on the 3, it was just hard because I was scared to carve off the lip." — Noah Brousseau

Too much fun, now get out there and freeride your fat bike!

Bike: Rocky Mountain Blizzard
Shot at the Coquihalla Lakes Lodge, Kamloops Bike Ranch, and Coastal Mountains, BC
Filmed & Edited by Liam Mullany
Additional Cinematography by Harrison Mendel
Produced by Liam Mullany & Brian Park
Photos by Robb Thompson & Kaz Yamamura
Special Thanks to Cory Leclerc, Bobby Brown at Maxxis, & Eric Simmons
Music: Jet Trash — Baby C'mon

Previous News Getting Fat in Gstaad: Snow Bike Fest 2016 The Swiss Mountains of Gstaad had more than enough snow to make the second edition of Snow Bike Festival a great success.
Next News Farewell to Raphaël Gagné We'd like to thank Raphaël Gagné for his nine seasons of dedication to racing and to our brand. Wish wish you the best in 2016 and beyond!
Feature

2015 BC Bike Race

July 10, 2015

Words by Scott Pilecki.
Photos by Margus Riga.

BC Bike Race is an undertaking that has to be experienced to be understood. It's more than just riding the trails or entering a race—it’s a life-changing event, and you need every participant to make it that.

Rocky Mountain athlete and BCBR head honcho Andreas Hestler shakes off the nerves for day one in Cumberland.

Geoff Gulevich brought his freeride game, tires, and handlebar-moustache to BCBR.

This year we brought a full roster of XC racers, ambassadors, freeriders, distrubutors, dealers, and friends. Geoff Gulevich left his full-face behind and slathered on the chamois butter. Adventure-loving Tito Tomasi was hemmed in by pink race tape and spandex but swore he would take adventurous lines every day.

Andreane Lanthier Nadeau came off a surprise Hood River Enduro win to show the Solo Women’s category how to descend on an XC bike. Local boy Quinn Moberg had something to prove as one of the youngest racers in this year’s Men’s Solo category. And Kevin Calhoun and Greg Day, who compete against each other in the local race scene, teamed up to take on the Men’s Team category.

This year’s BCBR was one of the toughest in the race’s 9 year history. Technical trail and ribbons of singletrack combined with temperatures in the 30’s challenged racers on all fronts. Each stage showed the character of the town, and how diverse the trails can be across BC's landscape.

Dave Vunic keeps the streets safe as an RCMP officer by day, and ripped it up to 13th place in Men’s Solo.

Christoph Listmann puts the hammer down on the flats.

Powell River was a highlight for us this year. The spectacular campground was on Willington beach for two nights next to the ocean. The trails there exemplified true singletrack racing, snaking brown pow through the sea of green moss. Each stop left its mark on the racers, whether literally or figuratively—there were lots of IV's being hooked up and bandages wrapped.

Kristen Gross showing BC that the California girl can rally the rocks in Squamish.

Quinn Moberg leading out from Sechelt to Langdale.

Michael Anthes in his element.

Our athletes both local and far-reaching couldn’t have made us more proud. After seven days of racing, the team of Greg Day and Kevin Calhoun took the overall win in the Elite Team category. Young gun Quinn Moberg worked hard all week, taking the stage win in his home town of Squamish and finishing the race 4th overall in Solo Men. Andreane Lanthier Nadeau took 4th in the women’s Solo, with Kris Gross hot on her heels in 5th.

How's your game face? Kevin Calhoun putting on a game face clinic from the start line.

Mr. Tito Tomasi. A wildman that is not afraid of grizzly bears or pushing his Thunderbolt BC Edition hard.

The German Bike Mag - Rocky Mountain team of Christoph Listmann and Michael Anthes took 2nd Place in the Veteran Team category. Udo and his brother Harty Bolts finished 2nd in their Team category. Udo raced in the Tour de France, in case the name sounds familiar. And in the Masters Solo Men's Thorsten Keller took the second step.

Race organizer and Rocky Mountain veteran Andreas Hestler rode to an impressive 9th place. Mike Sarnecki took 12th, Dave Vunic 13th, Tito Tomasi in 17th, and Geoff Gulevich 64th—not bad for a guy who normally does backflips not swtichbacks.

Greg Hayes, a veteran of the North Shore, showing he's not yet in the Veteran's category.

Hilscher Manfred wears a dusty grin after another day on course.

Our race mechanics were sweating in the heat to make sure that racers' bikes were in top form each day.

Every photo of ALN sees her smiling. After all it was her birthday on July 3rd, and 2nd place in Whistler on Day 7 served as a nice present.

Our thanks go out to BC Bike Race for having us on as a sponsor of such a great week of riding and impressions. We couldn’t have done it without the help of Fox Racing Shox, Shimano, Stan’s notubes, Smith Optics, Maxxis, WTB, FSA, Honey Stinger, Kicking Horse Coffee, Race Face, FTI Consulting, and IGUS. The event itself could not be done without the long list of volunteers and organizers, thank you for all your help and patience along the way. Especially with our beer garden and kids pool…

Previous Feature An Idiot's Guide to Bikepacking on Snow Skyler Des Roches continues to push the boundarys of where tires make tracks when he and Knut Kitching take a couple of Blizzards into the glaciers and snowy mountain passes of the South Chilcotins in the early Summer, by night.
Next Feature The Black Canyon Trail Wade Simmons, Andreas Hestler, Geoff Gulevich, Alex Cogger, and Brian Vernor head down to Arizona's Black Canyon Trail for some overland bikepacking in the desert.
Feature

The Black Canyon Trail

April 15, 2015

Film by Brian Vernor
Words by Wade Simmons
Photography by Margus Riga

For some, adventure is defined by harrowing near-death experiences. For me, having the intent to adventure is what defines it—even just getting away from civilization for a short while. And with that in mind we organized a trip to Arizona’s Sonoran Desert for an overland bikepacking trip early this spring: three self-supported days on the Black Canyon Trail’s 80 miles of secluded singletrack.

The roll-call included Olympian Andreas Hestler, shiny new tattooed freerider Geoff Gulevich, renowned filmmaker Brian Vernor, Rocky Mountain product guy Alex Cogger, and washed up old freerider Yours Truly. Our first goal was to escape the Pacific Northwest’s winter weather, and our second goal was to test Alex’s fancy new bike design.

We fumbled with our gear for hours in the parking lot of a Prescott motel the night before departure, packing and re-packing, adding and discarding. Ultimately we probably did pack too heavy, but there are the necessities of course: coffee, chocolate, down, wool, and whisky. Fully loaded, our steeds probably tipped the scales at 45+ lbs, and I was less and less sure that this was going to be fun.

There was something liberating in the first few pedal strokes that next morning leaving our drop-off zone, an innocent abandon of responsibility and order that comes with an uncertain weather forecast and only a vague itinerary. Fortunately, the overland bikes performed just as Alex had promised. It was evident in those first few miles that having our houses and kitchens packed along with us wasn’t going to keep us from having fun. It might have been the combination of increased overall mass and over-sized tires, but whatever it was we were having a blast absolutely ripping up the desert terrain on these fully loaded pack-horses—skids, drifts, airs, and all.

The Black Canyon Trail runs roughly 80 miles North to South. Beginning on a high plateau, it winds through rolling grasslands before descending into a landscape of Saguaros, Chollas, and other Sonoran Desert flora. We were treated to chilly nights and frosty desert mornings, but once that sun rose, layers were peeled and we had to contend with the steady, relentless heat of the day. The landscape we encountered was fully alien to us, full of incredibly beautiful things just waiting to stab you the moment you stray from the trail. Between the bullet-holes in everything and the buck-naked rider we ran into on day three, it was clear this trip was about getting weird in the desert.

 

We had been modest in planning our daily mileage expectations, allowing for explorations up various drainages, relaxed lunches by the Agua Fria river, and the necessary sessioning of worthy trail features. Each night however, our camp spot was reached a little later than expected, assembling tents and cooking dinner by the light of our headlamps.

Grizzled old-timers and keyboard adventurers alike might be disappointed by the lack of hardship we encountered—water wasn’t hard to come by, we ate enough, the bikes worked flawlessly, and the dire weather forecast never materialized. But for us, the trip was a complete success. We had a blast, it was an insight into new possibilities, and the best adventures are the ones that inspire future adventures.

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Words by Wade Simmons
Photography by Margus Riga
Film by Brian Vernor
Produced by Brian Park
Music by Brandon O'Connell
Featuring the Rocky Mountain Sherpa
Ridden by Wade Simmons, Geoff Gulevich, Brian Vernor, Alex Cogger, & Andreas Hestler

Presented by Rocky Mountain BicyclesManitou, & Pinkbike.
Supported by Overland JournalArc’teryxPorcelain RocketExped, & Defy Products.
Thanks to Scott Struve, Luke Musselman, Julian Coffey, Christophe Noel, Jo Salamon, Scott Felter, Benoit Deshayes, & Paul Breedlove.

Previous Feature 2015 BC Bike Race This year's BCBR was one of the toughest years ever. We set-up beer gardens and a kids pool to ease the pain.
Next News Introducing the Rocky Mountain Sherpa Designed to carry you and your gear to the ends of the earth, far from the nearest Strava segment.
Feature

Can You Freeride a Fat Bike?

December 22, 2014

We have to admit, we were hesitant about the fat bike trend that's taking the bike industry by storm (pun intended). There were definitely a few raised eyebrows in the office when we started designing and testing one.

Wade Simmons was an instant convert though; "everyone thinks they're so f@#&ing cool and serious, but it's really just about having fun on your bike anyway." And soon enough, the other guys stopped returning their test bikes on time.

FAT FREE came out of a few days of experimenting and shredding the Blizzard in BC's coastal mountains. It opened all our eyes to the spectacular terrain that's available for fat biking, and it proved to us that the only limitations for these bikes are our own preconceived notions.

If it was ever even a question, the answer is yes. You can and should freeride a fat bike.

Riders: Geoff Gulevich, Wade Simmons, & Brett Tippie, with appearances by Andreas Hestler & Fraser Vaage.
Filmed by: Liam Mullany, Connor Macleod, Chris Fisher, Brian Park, Fraser Vaage, & Andreas Hestler
Music (Main): "Outta Mind" by Night Beats, courtesy of The Reverberation Appreciation Society
Thanks to: Black Tusk Snowmobile Club, Tony Cailes, & Dylan Auld
Photography: Fraser Vaage & Brian Park

Visit bikes.com/blizzard to check out the Rocky Mountain Blizzard. We built it for aggressive, trail-style riding on snow, sand, and other soft terrain.

Previous Media Review Bike Mag Lauds Thunderbolt MSL Why did two of Bike Mag's editors pick the Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt 790 MSL BC Edition as their favorite of the 2015 Bible of Bike Tests?
Next News Rocky Mountain Dual at Snow Epic
News

Gully Storms the Castle

June 25, 2014

A group of sixteen invited freeride mountain bikers experienced an incredible week at the 2014 Suzuki Nine Knights in Livigno, Italy. In addition to heli, sunset, and sunrise shoots, riders explored the backcountry and freeride trails on Mottolino Fun Mountain.

Geoff Gulevich ("Gully") was a man on a mission to storm the castle, stomping a flip on the step up, airing huge on the hip, and flipping the tower drop on his Flatline. Super motivated, he was up at the crack of dawn for the freeride sessions and was more than happy when he earned himself a Nine Knights ring and the “Ruler of the Week” title.

Gully's other awards from the week:

  • Best Action Photo (by Christoph Laue)
  • Best Lifestyle Photo (by Markus Greber, with Andi Wittmann)
  • Best Illumination Photo (by Christoph Laue)

Event host Andi Wittmann (GER) was thrilled about the results of the week despite some difficult weather conditions. “I’m stoked that the teams were so motivated! The contest was quite different this year because of the new team concept and all the different riding styles, like enduro, big bike and freeriding.” The outcome at the award night was a true testament to the skill of the riders as well as the people behind the lenses.

Title Photo by Christoph Laue. Additional photos by Stéphane Candé.

Previous Feature Altitude Sickness — Highs & Lows at EWS #5: Winter Park, Colorado At over 10 000 feet of elevation in Winter Park, Colorado, this Enduro World Series stop promised to be one of the most physically challenging races of the season.
Next News New Web Store & Discount We've got a new Web Store & 10% Discount!

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