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Introducing the Overtimepack

June 25, 2020

IF SOME IS GOOD, MORE IS BETTER

The Overtimepack allows you to ride your Powerplay farther than ever before, putting more time in on the trail before needing a charge. 

The Overtimepack is a range extender for our Powerplay lineup that offers an additional 330 Wh of battery capacity. When combined with our massive 672 Wh Powerplay battery, you have over 1000 Wh to drain before it's time to rest. It's about more saddle time, more trail time, and more of the good times.

The Overtimepack drains its full 330 Wh capacity before you use any of the 672 Wh battery in your Powerplay. Your iWoc remote will read as fully charged until you begin to work your way through the main 672 Wh battery of the bike. The “RIDE MORE, FASTER, FURTHER” indicator on the Overtimepack will let you know how much of your 330 Wh battery remains.

  • No need to stop & swap batteries - Already plugged in, just keep riding.
  • Anti-rattle rigid attachment - Exterior battery mounts are notoriously sloppy. We offer a solid mount that’s designed for aggressive mountain biking.
  • Theft deterrent design - Tooled attachment discourages the theft of expensive accessories.
  • A more comfortable way to carry more energy - No need to carry a heavy battery on your back. Not only is it unsafe, but it can also throw your balance off.
  • A better handling eMTB - Overtimepack pack is located down low on the bike by the drive
     

CHARGING

You can use the standard Powerplay 5A charger for the Overtimepack (while attached). You can charge both batteries in parallel with two separate chargers even more quickly. Overtimepack can serve as a Jerrycan charger, filling the main battery without a charger. It takes 2.5 charges of the Overtimepack to Jerrycan fill a 672Wh Powerplay battery completely.


If the 672Wh battery in your Powerplay is empty, the Overtimepack will charge your battery to nearly 50% in a little over 2 hours.

Visit our Overtimepack or  Powerplay page for more information.

Filmed by Liam Mullany
Featuring Vaea Verbeeck
Photos by Margus Riga

Previous Feature An Argentina Adventure 5 part video series. This trip wasn't about finding big hucks, shredding scree slopes, heli-shuttles, or filming for a feature movie. It was about finding a true mountain bike adventure and sharing it with close friends.
Next Feature Sam Schultz on Starting the Montana NICA League
Feature

Two-wheeled passion

April 15, 2020






Get them started young! Everyone deserves a Rocky Mountain, even if you’re not ready to push the pedals yet. Starting with an easy to maneuver run bike, the Edge series offers a wheelsize for any young rider.
 
View the models

 

Previous Feature Sam Schultz on Starting the Montana NICA League
Next Feature The 2020 Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team We’re excited to return to the Enduro World Series this year with our existing Canadian partner, Race Face Performance Products.
Feature

The 2020 Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team

March 06, 2020

We’re excited to return to the Enduro World Series this year with our existing Canadian partner, Race Face Performance Products. Over the past two years, the Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro team has made its mark on enduro racing and we’re thrilled to keep up that momentum. 

Over the past few seasons, we’ve watched Jesse Melamed, Andréane Lanthier Nadeau, and Rémi Gauvin come together as a team and add their own flavour to enduro racing. We’re proud to have all three of them on board this year and excited to bring the world along for the ride with a second season of “The Jank Files”.  

With the recent news of race cancellations in South America, we'll be ready as a team for when the race schedule is back to normal.

Peter Ostroski has been riding for Rocky Mountain in one way or another for 18 years! He’s been on every enduro race team we’ve ever had and these days his race schedule includes a mix of EWS races, the Trans Madeira, and the BC Bike Race. 2020 marks a particularly exciting season for Peter, with the announcement of his home tracks being raced at the EWS #6 in Burke, Vermont. 

Previous Feature Two-wheeled passion Learning to Love the Ride during a pandemic
Next Feature Guiding in the Dolomites I’ve spent several years riding my mountain bike through remote, little-known places around the world. Usually, I’m barely back at home before the next wave of wanderlust comes over me and I feel the pull to set off again. 
Feature

Guiding in the Dolomites

February 25, 2020
We hope this story inspires you and allows you to daydream about your past riding adventures. As riders, we know that spending time on the trails helps us during these times of uncertainty, but we ask that you minimize the risks to yourself and others, and join us in following all local health guidelines as you venture outside.

 

Story by Julia Hofmann
Photos by Mattias Fredriksson

When I was young and exploring in the garden and woods around my house, I always found the most joy in sharing my discoveries with others; a new hiding spot or some exciting forest treasure. As I’ve gotten older, it’s still a favourite pastime, only now my world extends further, and my discoveries are much bigger.   

I’ve spent several years riding my mountain bike through remote, little-known places around the world. Usually, I’m barely back at home before the next wave of wanderlust comes over me and I feel the pull to set off again. 

I am fascinated by the people I’ve met, different cultures and landscapes I’ve experienced, and the incredible singletrack I’ve ridden. Each country has had unique trails; in Chile they are deep and dusty, in Canada they are steep and technical tracks through the forest, and in Norway the trails run between the fjords and over stone slabs and tree roots. Kosovo, Albania, France, Spain – each has had a different flavour. In sharing details about my travels, I am able to inspire others to also explore the world with their bikes – and it feels as joyful as sharing my garden hiding spots back in the day.  

It was this passion for travel and inclusion that led to my guiding career. I wanted to help other mountain bikers enjoy what I was experiencing; nature, the trails, and the local culture in these special places. So when I was asked if I wanted to do some skills training and guiding in the Dolomites, I couldn’t refuse. 

The Dolomites are one of the most unique and impressive rock formations in the world. And although they are just three and a half hours drive from where I live, I had never been to the area. I only knew of the Dolomites through winter sports and road bike racing – every road biker dreams of doing the famous Sellaronda route one day – but I had no idea that a world-class mountain biking paradise was also tucked away there.

When I finally stood in the mountains there I was overwhelmed by impressiveness of the landscape. Whichever way I looked – north, south, east or west – each and every vista was picture-postcard worthy. The sight of these huge, sheer rockfaces rising up out of the pale green undulating meadows is so powerful that it literally takes your breath away. The infrastructure is perfect for mountain bikers too; all the gondolas take bikes and there are plenty of lifts to access the riding zones. I knew instantly that this was one of those big discoveries and I couldn’t wait for the joy of sharing it with others. 

For the first few years, I found the layout of the mountains confusing. There are so many different interconnecting valleys in the Dolomites that I would suddenly find myself in the wrong one. Often it would be getting late and I had no idea how to get back to where I was meant to be. (Having an e-bike came in handy in these situations.) I was grateful that my friend, Arno Feichter runs the local bike shop in Sexten and is also a guide. He gave me the lay of the land and also introduced me to all the secret little gems that can only be found with local knowledge. 

The natural trails here are steep and technical at the top, often taking you over rugged, rocky slab formations – with no room for error. Further down the valley and below the treeline, the ground gets softer and the trails become more flowy and playful, with a slippery tree root here and a natural berm there. Back down at the bottom, it’s either time for a pizza or another lift to head back up the mountain.

Over the past few years, more and more flow trails have been developed in the Dolomites, allowing even the greenest of mountain bikers to enjoy the high-mountain scenery and creating the perfect environment for my beginners’ skills courses. Combining a guided experience with some skills training – correct position for braking, pushing, and jumping – allows riders to feel more confident and therefore get more enjoyment out of the trails and stunning environment.

Whenever I’m in the area, Arno shows me yet another, even more stunning trail in the Tre Cime region. Last autumn we spent five days together; on E-bike reccies, carrying our regular mountain bikes up technical sections via ferratas, and doing laps on the Helm; the local mountain near the village of Sexten. And even with that, I’ve hardly even covered a quarter of the trails, so there really is plenty experience – and share. 

Julia Hofmann has been a part of the Rocky Mountain family for several years. While she spends her time on a myriad of different bikes from us, the ones featured in this article include her Altitude Powerplay, Altitude, and Slayer

Previous Feature The 2020 Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team We’re excited to return to the Enduro World Series this year with our existing Canadian partner, Race Face Performance Products.
Next Feature Electric Adventures Greg Hill has spent the last two years of his life focused on proving the potential of electric adventures. He gave up using fossil fuels to access his adventures and has worked hard at the idea of exploring what it means to adventure sustainably.
Feature

Electric Adventures

January 17, 2020

Story by: Greg Hill
Photos by: Bruno Long

The topic of electric mountain bikes tends to be a polarizing conversation these days and people can be defensive and confrontational, no matter what side of the coin they’ve chosen. In my mind, the general adoption of e-bikes as a means of transportation is a given and the conversations would be more constructive if they focused on how and why they can improve our lives and took a step away from a judgmental “no way” stance.

I’ve spent the last two years of my life focused on proving the potential of electric adventures. I gave up using fossil fuels to access my adventures and have worked hard at the idea of exploring what it means to adventure sustainably. Living in British Columbia, 98% of our electricity is renewable hydroelectricity. If there’s ever a place where an electric vehicle make sense, it’s here. A major challenge I gave myself when switching to a more sustainable way of adventuring was to try and summit 100 peaks through the use of my skis, climbing shoes, running shoes, or on my mountain bike - accessing everything with the help of an electric car. By accomplishing this goal, I proved that electric cars are viable as adventures vehicles but couldn’t help but wonder what other modes of transportation could help the process. What were some ways in which I could travel further into the backcountry where my little hatchback didn’t want to go? Or what about other people that were interested in the idea of a sustainable adventure but couldn’t afford a $45,000 car?

Naturally, my electric exploration took me into the field of e-bikes. I had ripped around on an Instinct Powerplay in our trail network which is usually for shuttling and it was an eye-opening experience. My friend and I rode right from town, climbed to the top easily, laughing and chatting on the climb, and had an absolute blast coming back down. The Instinct Powerplay proved itself to me as a viable way to work the local trail network, but what about as an adventure mobile?

Last spring, I set up a Growler Powerplay for going places in a simpler way and without the use of my electric car. I’d set it up for nearly every type of adventure I could think of which included panniers and baskets on the front and back for my climbing gear, running gear, and most importantly my ski gear. It's a little odd for such a sick mountain bike to become a gear-laden donkey, but I promised it some great adventures.

I had no idea how useful this e-bike was going to be. Since I’m a skier first and foremost, my first goal was to ride my e-bike out of town, and climb and ski Revelstoke’s iconic peak, Mount Begbie. I’d skied Mount Begbie many times before, but setting out and riding 15km to the trailhead, summiting, shredding, and then an E-asy ride home was both simple and rewarding.

That trip up Mount Begbie was just the start of my time on the Growler Powerplay and what truly blew my mind was something I hadn’t expected; the fact that it opened up the door to adventures for others in my family. My 13-year old daughter took the bike for a 20km ride simply because she was having a great daydream and wanted it to continue. She’s not one for cardio and I’ve always had trouble motivating her to get and explore with me. There was another day where she was determined to join me on a road ride, and spent the time coaching me on the climbs with both encouragement and enthusiasm.

My 70-year old dad, who is not a very active person, threw his leg over the Growler Powerplay and joined me on a road ride up to the Revelstoke Dam. While I huffed and puffed my way up the valley, I couldn’t help but recognize how special it was to be able to go and exercise with my dad. Opportunities like this have never come along before, and it was the e-MTB that made it a reality.

Last July, my friend and I borrowed two Instinct Powerplay’s and headed to Joss Mountain for what was sure to be an epic ride. I was sitting at 98 summits accessed electrically and I wanted to get to the top of a mountain by e-bike. The Joss Mountain trail ascends 1100m and is about 17km return with several hike-a-bike sections. This trail was built to access a summit lookout for monitoring wild fires and was not designed to be ridden. For the sections that were too steep to pedal (even with the assistance of the drive system), the “walk-mode” feature kept us moving onward and upward towards peak #99.

 

 

 

 

 

All summer, I used the Growler Powerplay to rip around town, get groceries, go rock climbing, and cut down the time spent getting to trailheads. Sure, I could have ridden by normal mountain bike to them but this allowed me more energy for the activities themselves. And being honest with myself, even though it’s only 2 km into town I sometimes get lazy and don’t want to pedal my mountain bike. The e-bike helped me overcome that that laziness and all of a sudden it just seemed simpler with less involved to ride than drive.

Now that it’s winter again, I’ll use the bike less as the roads here are completely covered in snow. Yet when the roads are clear I’m happy to pedal up to the local ski resort, Revelstoke Mountain Resort, where their electric-run lifts align with my own beliefs. When the roads open up again in the spring I’ll be back pedalling up logging roads to access deeper backcountry ski routes.

I knew getting onto an e-bike made sense with my eco-conscious activities, but I didn’t really realize how many doors it would open for me and my family. The potential of these bikes is as endless as the dreams I can create.
 
Previous Feature Guiding in the Dolomites I’ve spent several years riding my mountain bike through remote, little-known places around the world. Usually, I’m barely back at home before the next wave of wanderlust comes over me and I feel the pull to set off again. 
Next Feature Frozen Bikes and Big Descents: Thomas Vanderham takes on the Variables of Trans-Cascadia With a career spanning two decades, Thomas Vanderham has dabbled in just about every style of riding going – he’s clearly best known for his freeriding edits – but it’s been some time since he’s participated in anything with a timing chip. “This was a little bit of a departure for me, but I’m always open to new experiences,” he says of his experience at Trans-Cascadia; a 4-day backcountry enduro held in the depths of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in Washington state.
Feature

Frozen Bikes and Big Descents: Thomas Vanderham takes on the Variables of Trans-Cascadia

January 17, 2020

“Some of the best riding I’ve done – I don’t even know really how to put it into words.” - Thomas Vanderham

With a career spanning two decades, Thomas Vanderham has dabbled in just about every style of riding going – he’s clearly best known for his freeriding edits – but it’s been some time since he’s participated in anything with a timing chip. “This was a little bit of a departure for me, but I’m always open to new experiences,” he says of his experience at Trans-Cascadia; a 4-day backcountry enduro held in the depths of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in Washington state.

Despite spending a little time reading up on the event, having seen coverage from previous years, and hearing first-hand accounts from past participants, Thomas found prepping for the event quite the challenge. With a variable weather forecast that called for the possibility of freezing temperatures and snow, there was a lot for him to consider about what to bring and how to best set up his bike.

“I talked to a few people who had done it and definitely heard that 29-inch wheels were the way to go just because of how much pedalling there was and the type of terrain.” Thomas built up an Instinct BC and lightened it up a little with a different rear shock and a few other changes. Based on what he had heard about the length of the days and stages, he put 203mm rotors on the front and back. “This wouldn't be my like typical setup, but it ended up being so clutch.”

Thomas was also really happy about was his tire selection. After debating for a long time about weight, compound, width, and tread pattern, he ended up with a DHR2. “It’s not a mud tire, but it's the closest thing to a mud tire in a more normal tread pattern.”

The next challenge was what to bring for clothing and gear. “Packing was quite difficult – you're only allowed to bring one bag and I wanted to be as prepared as possible.” He threw in multiple jackets, layers, and extra gloves, socks, and eyewear. This allowed him to approach each day of the race like he was prepping for a day of ski touring – ensuring that he had warm and dry options in his riding pack for all occasions. “I probably over-packed every day, I certainly had a heavier pack I think than some of the other riders out there, but I just never wanted to be uncomfortable. I had a warm layer; a light puffy jacket for rest stops. And then I had two rain layers in my pack just in case one got really wet. I saw some of the serious racers rolling around with next to nothing, I was pretty impressed with that.”

Coming into the race, Thomas didn’t know a lot about the details of the terrain. “I came in without any expectations – and it was a week of standouts! They were some of the best trails. They were as good or better than advertised; incredibly long sustained downhills” – especially on Day 3.

On the morning of Day 3, Thomas and the other racers had woken up to snow in the campground and frozen bikes and tents. “It was just clear and cold and when we were riding there was no problem with temperature, we were nice and warm. The approach to the first trail was incredible. It was really misty with the sun coming through it was so beautiful up on this ridgeline.” Racers pedalled up a 1000-foot climb from Takhlakh Lake and took in some incredible views of Mount Adams along the way. The first stage of the day was an 1100-foot descent over 1.2 miles of super-fast gravity-fed flow, following that they traversed along a road to the top of the next stage and to 1200 feet of descending over 1.5 miles with a little rolling climb – and easy grind – in the middle. At the bottom of the stage, they were treated to a big fire and hot lunch. But what truly made Day 3 a favourite among racers was yet to come.

After lunch, they got a bump up in shuttles to the ridgeline on the non-motorized side of the Gifford Pinchot. From the drop-off point, racers had a 1-1.5-hour pedal with a couple of playful descents as they traversed. The snow at the top of this next stage made everything a little more exciting, and the Strawberry mountain trail which had been universally described as “an insane descent” and “deep loam” and “12/10, best ever” did not disappoint.

“I think that was an 11-minute trail and it just felt like you were going mach speed the whole time,” says Thomas. “It’s something I don’t get to ride very often, and I was just loving it!”

Unfortunately, the day was cut short due to weather. “The whole day was incredible until the end, we got cut off the last stage because a big snowstorm rolled in. [Before that was] some of the best riding I’ve done – I don’t even know really how to put it into words.

[The Trans-Cascadia team] do an amazing job of creating really good sightlines so that even though you are riding it blind, you can really see what's coming. They do a good job of making it safe in that way. A lot of the trails are formed by motos, so they have this incredible sort of arc to the turns. With the good amount of moisture in the dirt too, it made it so fun to ride. It was tacky. A little bit was muddy, but it was awesome.”

Although Thomas wistfully wonders what Trans-Cascadia would have been like had it been sunny and warm the whole time, he also felt that the extreme weather added to the overall experience. “It wasn't the easiest, but it was cool. It created some incredible scenery; seeing the snow on the mountains and the trails. The trails were just this perfect brown ribbon framed in with the white snow on the side. It was pretty spectacular! It was a week full of hooting and hollering and high fives. And I thought on numerous occasions through the whole week that my bike was feeling so good. I think I brought the perfect bike.”

Previous Feature Electric Adventures Greg Hill has spent the last two years of his life focused on proving the potential of electric adventures. He gave up using fossil fuels to access his adventures and has worked hard at the idea of exploring what it means to adventure sustainably.
Next Feature Thomas Vanderham Slayer Raw Starting with Carson Storch in Utah, following up with Rémi Gauvin on Vancouver Island, the Slayer Raw Cut series wraps up with freeride legend Thomas Vanderham riding Kamloops, British Columbia.
Feature

Thomas Vanderham Slayer Raw

December 04, 2019

Starting with Carson Storch in Utah, following up with Rémi Gauvin on Vancouver Island, the Slayer Raw Cut series wraps up with freeride legend Thomas Vanderham riding Kamloops, British Columbia. Over the years, Thomas has filmed numerous riding segments in BC’s interior. His riding style seems to work so well on the trails around Kamloops, being that the trails give him plenty of opportunity to ride fast and send it big. Known for throwing massive whips, Thomas always looks incredibly composed on his bike.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Cinematography: Harrison Mendel, Liam Mullany
Colourist: Sam Gilling
Post-production Sound: Keith White Audio
Still photography: Margus Riga
Thanks: Ron Penney, Landmark Trail Works, Carlos Zumino
 
 
Previous Feature Frozen Bikes and Big Descents: Thomas Vanderham takes on the Variables of Trans-Cascadia With a career spanning two decades, Thomas Vanderham has dabbled in just about every style of riding going – he’s clearly best known for his freeriding edits – but it’s been some time since he’s participated in anything with a timing chip. “This was a little bit of a departure for me, but I’m always open to new experiences,” he says of his experience at Trans-Cascadia; a 4-day backcountry enduro held in the depths of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in Washington state.
Next Feature Rémi Gauvin Slayer Raw The first Slayer Raw Cut featured Carson Storch riding big hits in the Utah desert, a stark contrast from Episode 2 in the dark and dank forests of Vancouver Island.
Feature

Rémi Gauvin Slayer Raw

December 03, 2019

The first Slayer Raw Cut featured Carson Storch riding big hits in the Utah desert, a stark contrast from Episode 2 in the dark and dank forests of Vancouver Island. Rémi Gauvin grew up in those woods, and the technical, wet trails of the coastal rainforest have played a major role in shaping him as a rider.

 

 

 

 

 

Rémi first signed with Rocky Mountain in 2015 and the next year began racing enduro. Fast forward to current day, and Rémi finished his 2019 with his best results yet, placing 6th overall in the Enduro World Series and winning the Canadian National Enduro Championship. Off the track, it’s full throttle, riding just as hard as when the clock’s ticking. Wet roots, blind corners, and slippery chutes are all part of what makes the riding on Vancouver Island some of the best in the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
www.bikes.com/slayer
Cinematography: Harrison Mendel, Liam Mullany
Colourist: Sam Gilling
Post-production Sound: Keith White Audio
Still photography: Margus Riga
Thanks: Riley McIntosh, Mark Wallace
 
 
Previous Feature Thomas Vanderham Slayer Raw Starting with Carson Storch in Utah, following up with Rémi Gauvin on Vancouver Island, the Slayer Raw Cut series wraps up with freeride legend Thomas Vanderham riding Kamloops, British Columbia.
Next Feature Carson Storch Slayer Raw For Carson’s section we went to Virgin, Utah, known for its massive features and big mountain lines. This project was shot in the spring, which gave Carson a chance to put his tires in the dirt a few months before this year’s Red Bull Rampage. 2019 marked Carson’s 6th year competing at Rampage, and in that time, he’s stomped some massive spins, drops, and unique features.
Feature

Carson Storch Slayer Raw

November 28, 2019

When we introduced the new Slayer back in August, we released “Oscillation” featuring Thomas Vanderham, Rémi Gauvin, and Carson Storch. That video showed the three riders tackling the dry and dusty trails in of BC’s interior, the wet and rooty trails on Vancouver Island, and the big moves and lines of Virgin, Utah. From that shoot, we shot enough footage to cut together three raw videos in a mix of the best clips and never before seen footage. One for each rider in the locations they helped choose.

 

 

 

 

 

For Carson’s section we went to Virgin, Utah, known for its massive features and big mountain lines. This project was shot in the spring, which gave Carson a chance to put his tires in the dirt a few months before this year’s Red Bull Rampage. 2019 marked Carson’s 6th year competing at Rampage, and in that time, he’s stomped some massive spins, drops, and unique features. For this project he wanted to push it outside of a contest environment and land switch spins, flip combo’s, and fresh lines on a brand-new bike.

 

 

 

 

 

Cinematography: Harrison Mendel, Liam Mullany
Colourist: Sam Gilling
Post-production Sound: Keith White Audio
Still photography: Margus Riga
Thanks: Matt Edleston, Dylan Cobern.
 
 
Previous Feature Rémi Gauvin Slayer Raw The first Slayer Raw Cut featured Carson Storch riding big hits in the Utah desert, a stark contrast from Episode 2 in the dark and dank forests of Vancouver Island.
Next Feature “En Marche” – The Vallée Bras du Nord story This is the fairytale story of purpose-built singletrack set amongst some of Quebec’s most stunning vistas and constructed by some unlikely characters.
Feature

“En Marche” – The Vallée Bras du Nord story

October 31, 2019

“Have you ever thought about building bike trails here?” This pivotal question was posed fifteen years ago, in a yurt perched high atop Delaney falls - the landmark of the Vallée Bras-du-Nord, in Saint-Raymond, Quebec - and it sparked the conversation that would lead to a world-renowned mountain bike mecca and an award-winning youth program.

 

 

At the time the Co-op Vallée Bras-du-Nord, an innovative model of cooperative management, was only celebrating their second anniversary. In that short time, they had already developed reception facilities, several refuges, and 60 km of hiking trails.

Frédéric Asselin, Director of the Co-op, was sharing the yurt with Géo Plein-Air magazine journalist Gilles Morneau; professional mountain biker Mathieu Toulouse; and national team mountain bike head coach Michel LeBlanc. The trio was in the area on a hiking and canoeing trip. Frédéric, always on the lookout for new activities to stimulate growth, listened attentively as the men discussed the potential for mountain bike trails in the valley. It quickly became clear that the glacial valley with its cliffs, rivers, and waterfalls, was the perfect natural setting for two-wheeled exploration.

That evening, a seed was sown. And just over a year later, after Frédéric had visited other bike parks and fell in love with mountain biking himself, the idea of building bike trails was presented to and approved by the board of directors of the Vallée Bras-du-Nord. And in 2007 the youth project, En Marche began work on the trails.

The En Marche project is designed to give kids who are struggling; have dropped out of school, are dealing with family violence, drug addiction, and delinquency, the opportunity to be out in nature using forestry work as an educational tool. Dozens of young men and women are selected each year to work building and maintaining trails within the valley.

The youth spend six months swinging pulaskis and mcleods, while a trained social worker accompanies them each day. At the end of the summer, the whole team takes part in a wilderness adventure trip, where, confronted with a hostile environment, they learn about tolerance, discipline, teamwork, and perseverance.

By 2008, the En Marche team had already built roughly fifteen kilometres of mountain bike specific singletracks and twice that length in double-track. The cyclists came, loved it, and began spreading the word. The (now) famous Chute à Gilles, which passes at the foot of a nice waterfall, set the tone for what the valley had to offer and became its signature trail. The excitement among riders grew every year thereafter, especially with the opening of the Saint-Raymond sector, Grande Ourse trail, and Maple butter trail; a very flowy roller coaster built on a kame (a hill of glacial origin composed of sand and gravel).

Recently, the "En Marche" team spearheaded the construction of the most iconic track of the Valley, the Neilson Trail. Three summers were needed to create what is often called a ‘masterpiece’ in a breathtaking natural setting. The young craftsmen carved a sweet rideable ribbon along the Neilson riverbank; building the bridges, carving the rock in places to reach seemingly inaccessible sections, and incorporating as much as possible of the beautiful granite slabs that have been polished by the flow of water for centuries.

On the strength of these repeated successes, the Valley has seen the number of its two-wheeled visitors multiply each year, and has now acquired the status of an unmissable destination. The quality of its facilities and how the Co-op works with the community, businesses, loggers, and landowners are what have helped the valley to flourish and become a model of sustainable tourism. But the Vallée Bras-du Nord’s greatest pride remains the more than 200 young men and women who have built the trail network. These trail builders can be proud, not only of the work they have done in the forest but also on themselves. Three-quarters of the youth who have participated in this program re-entered the job market or returned to school - and some still work for Vallée Brass-du-Nord. Last year, the En Marche project received the highest mark of distinction for a youth intervention program when the director, Étienne Beaumont was presented with the Youth Recognition Award at the National Assembly from Quebec’s premier Philippe Couillard.

Rocky Mountain has been the exclusive bike partner of Vallée Bras-du Nord since 2008, ensuring that the trail builders and staff are able to access and enjoy the hard work they have put in.

Previous Feature Carson Storch Slayer Raw For Carson’s section we went to Virgin, Utah, known for its massive features and big mountain lines. This project was shot in the spring, which gave Carson a chance to put his tires in the dirt a few months before this year’s Red Bull Rampage. 2019 marked Carson’s 6th year competing at Rampage, and in that time, he’s stomped some massive spins, drops, and unique features.
Next Feature Carson Storch Interview – Ready to Rampage Going into his fifth year competing at Red Bull Rampage, Carson has already experienced nearly all the highs and lows an event of this magnitude can offer.

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