Feature

Feature

2021 Rocky Mountain Instinct Powerplay – Jesse Melamed’s custom build 

December 15, 2020

Jesse Melamed riding the Instinct Powerplay in Vancouver

"Every time I have ridden a Rocky Mountain Powerplay over the last few years I have a riot of a time. I usually can't stop smiling. Now that I have one of my own I can't wait to get out and find some hill-climb challenges and explore some new trails. It will be the perfect tool for when I need a rest day but still want to get out and ride!"    

-Jesse Melamed

Frame:  Instinct Powerplay, size Medium, RIDE-9 in Position 1

Fork:  Fox 38 Float EVOL Grip2 Factory Series 170mm  

Shock:  Fox DPX2 210x55mm, with Rocky Mountain shock bearing eyelets  

Stem:  Race Face TurbineR 40mm reach, 35mm clamp with EDC  tool

Handlebars:  Race Face NextR 740mm width, 35mm clamp, 35mm rise  

Headset: FSA Orbit NO.57E

Grips: Race Face Love Handle

Brakes:  Shimano XTR 4-Piston Finned Metal Pads RT86 203mm Fr RT86 203mm Rr  

Shifter: Shimano XTR 12 speed 

Derailleur: Shimano XTR 12-speed  

Cassette:  Shimano XTR  10-45

Chain: Shimano XTR  

Chainguide:  OneUp Components Chain Guide Top Kit V2  

Pedals:  Crankbrothers Mallet E  

Wheels: Race Face TurbineR 30mm 

Tires: Maxxis Assegai MaxxGrip DH 29x2.5WT / Maxxis Minion DHR2 MaxxGrip DH 29x2.5WT 

Seatpost:  Fox Transfer 150mm

Saddle: WTB Silverado

Click here to explore the 2021 Instinct Powerplay models. 

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed riding the Instinct Powerplay in Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

Jesse Melamed Instinct Powerplay Vancouver

 

Previous News 2021 Rocky Mountain Instinct Powerplay BC Edition – Rémi Gauvin’s custom build  “I am really excited to finally have a Powerplay in my bike quiver. In the short time that I have had the bike, I have already had a ton of fun riding and using it. It has allowed me to get a few sneaky MTB rides in when the sun has been shining on days that I have been too tired to pedal fully on my own steam as I am now back into a full-time offseason training schedule. The time it takes to get to the top of the trails is staggeringly quick and the bike is no slouch on the way back down either. It has also been a blast to boot around town on! Because it is based off of the Instinct BC platform that I have ridden on hundreds of hours already it was instantly comfortable for me and I am looking forward to riding it more this winter!”
Next Feature Live Like the Kids The early teenage years are both a challenging and formative time for everyone. It’s a time of discovery, new direction, and finding your passion, all while under the limitations of lacking a driver’s license, having a curfew, and learning trigonometry. Jesse Munden and Dane Jewett both discovered riding at a young age and are all-in when it comes to big hits and road trips – so long as they can get a ride from their parents. Dane and Jesse are both young riders who are lucky enough to be growing up in two of BC’s best riding zones.
Feature

Felix Burke's Recipe for Stoke

October 20, 2020

Traces of dust stick to the back of your sweaty neck as you drink some cold and much needed water. Ahhhh, refreshing. Behind you, an excruciatingly long fire road climb. In front of you, a view that makes it all worth it, especially knowing what lies ahead, a ribbon of single-track that will offer an adrenaline fuelled descent back down to the valley from which you climbed. Nothing but hoots, hollers and high fives ahead!

We all have our reasons for riding, but the elements that make us fall for this sport are something we share. Trail Trybe, a bike camp for kids located at heart the Laurentian mountains in Mont-Tremblant, Québec, has been searching for the perfect combination of ingredients that together form an epic ride. Why? To develop the recipe for stoke and cook up the next generation of passionate mountain bikers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

​​​​​​Stoked Riders: An organic recipe for getting young riders hooked on the flavours of Mountain Biking

Ingredients:

  • 1 bicycle per person – well greased and tuned (20”, 24”, 26”,27.5” or 29” will work)
  • 1 or more friends – happy and hungry for adventure.
  • 1 map of the area (sourced locally for best quality)
  • 1-2 handfuls of tasty snacks and lots of water. To taste.
  • Clothing and protection (doesn’t have to be beautiful, but needs to be reliable and comfortable)
  • 1 challenging but attainable objective (the top of a mountain is always a good one)

Instructions:

Whisk together the group of friends and organize a meeting spot that will set the tone for the ride. Locations near rivers and lakes, close to a set of jumps or a pump-track, or a short walk away from a cold slurpy for post-ride refreshments are ideal.

Take out the map so that the whole group can see, it is important that everyone can visualize the terrain you will be traveling through on the map. Locate a distant, but not too distant trail as your objective. Be careful not to choose an objective that will burn the group.

Ideal temperature for the ride is between 15 and 25 degrees with a little bit of humidity in the dirt but not in the air. A couple of days after heavy rain is usually the best. If done too hot, exhaustion will lead to poor results and roasting. If done too cold, discomfort may also lead to poor results.

Chef’s wisdom: Golden hour (the hour before sunset) is the most efficient time of day for creating epic ride experiences and delivering stoke directly to the soul!

Expect group morale to fall when just under halfway to objective. Distance to travel still seems great but fatigue will have started to set in. This is a very delicate part in the process and, like a freshly baked pastry, must be handled with care. Overcoming challenges is what boosts confidence and confidence is a crucial part of igniting passion in young riders. Reassuring words like “Wow, look at everything we have ridden already! Very impressive!” or “You’re doing great, you gotta be pretty heckin' tough to get this far!” are mixed in carefully here. Pay attention to the group and mix in only what is needed, kids know when you are lying. Keep cool with water as you ride.

Chef’s wisdom: Sugar! The mere thought of it can accelerate the group and boost morale. Season with candy and other tasty treats throughout the ride to help the group get through difficult sections. (Clif BLOKS are amazing for this)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you have made it to the objective, celebrate! Confidence comes from overcoming challenges. Make sure the group knows they have overcome a challenge and that they can be proud of themselves. Let spirits rise.

Chef’s wisdom: Begin to teach a respect for our natural world by taking the time to appreciate viewpoints, trees, rivers etc. Take it all in, it’s good for everyone.

The ride back is the home stretch and should be full of fun! Throw in some hoots, hollers and screams of delight as you descend or ride back. The auditive experience is more important than most people think. By the end of this step you should start to see a golden glow around the riders.

Once back from the ride, celebrate again! Have a cold slurpy, share some stories from the ride and throw in some high-fives to taste. You have just done an epic ride; you should be stoked!

Every serving of stoked kid is loaded with fibre, proteins and a desire to live life to its fullest!

*Note: This recipe can be tricky. If you do not get the desired results on the first try, do not be discouraged. Listen and pay attention to your group and make the appropriate adjustments in the following attempts.

For more information on Felix's program visit www.trailtrybe.com.

Tags: Felix Burke

Previous Feature Live Like the Kids The early teenage years are both a challenging and formative time for everyone. It’s a time of discovery, new direction, and finding your passion, all while under the limitations of lacking a driver’s license, having a curfew, and learning trigonometry. Jesse Munden and Dane Jewett both discovered riding at a young age and are all-in when it comes to big hits and road trips – so long as they can get a ride from their parents. Dane and Jesse are both young riders who are lucky enough to be growing up in two of BC’s best riding zones.
Next Feature The Jank Files - Season 2, Episode 2 Jesse said it best with, “We’re back in Italy. We’re back living off gelato.” Filmed in both Pietra Ligure and Finale Ligure, this is Episode 2 of The Jank Files.
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The Jank Files - Season 2, Episode 2

October 02, 2020

The racing season hit hard and fast when it finally made its debut. Starting with Zermatt in the last week of August and finishing with two races in Italy, Pietra Ligure and Finale Ligure, before the end of September. The 2020 season was a flash in the pan packing a lot of action into just a few weeks.

Riders around the world were on the “hurry up and wait” program this year, and Jesse Melamed, Rémi Gauvin, and Andréane Lanthier Nadeau were no different. Even by mid-August, they were unsure whether or not they’d be making the trip over to Europe to race, and in the final weeks before Race 1, they went all in and boarded a plane.

Jesse said it best with, “We’re back in Italy. We’re back living off gelato.” Filmed in both Pietra Ligure and Finale Ligure, this is Episode 2 of The Jank Files.

 

Filmed by Caldwell Visuals
Photos by Kike Abelleira

A big thank you to all our sponsors!
Race Face, Maxxis, Fox, Shimano, Smith Optics, WTB, OneUp Components, Stages Cycling, EVOC, RideWrap

Previous Feature Felix Burke's Recipe for Stoke Traces of dust stick to the back of your sweaty neck as you drink some cold and much needed water. Ahhhh, refreshing. Behind you, an excruciatingly long fire road climb. In front of you, a view that makes it all worth it, especially knowing what lies ahead, a ribbon of single-track that will offer an adrenaline fuelled descent back down to the valley from which you climbed. Nothing but hoots, hollers and high fives ahead!
Next Feature A Product of the Environment The Rocky Mountain Altitude will help you hold the high lines, tee up trail gaps, and push a pace that you didn’t know you had in you. Ridden by the Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro team, the redesigned Altitude is now more capable than ever and has everything you need to take your riding to the next level. Just go fast – because fast is fun. 
Feature

2021 Rocky Mountain Slayer – Wade Simmons’ custom build

August 20, 2020

The Slayer was designed to be ridden fast, sent off huge hits, and take the abuse of a bike park lap after lap. The Godfather of Freeride, Wade Simmons, has been sending it aboard Rocky Mountain for nearly 30 years. Wade put freeriding on the map, and he’s still out there sending it aboard custom-built bikes.

 

 

 

 

 

Frame: Slayer, size Large, RIDE-4 Position 4 (Steepest) 

Fork: Marzocchi Bomber Z1 Coil 180mm 

Shock: Marzocchi Bomber CR 230x65mm, with Rocky Mountain shock bearing eyelets 

Stem: Race Face 32mm reach, 35mm clamp 

Handlebar: Race Face SixC 800mm width, 35mm clamp, 25mm rise 

Grips: Race Face Half Nelson 

Brakes: Shimano XTR 4 Piston | Finned Metal Pads | RT86 203mm Fr | RT86 203mm Rr 

Shifter: Shimano XTR 12-speed 

Derailleur: Shimano XT 12-speed 

Crankset: Race Face SixC 

Cassette: Shimano XTR 

Chain: Shimano XTR 

Chainguide: OneUp Components Chain Guide Top Kit V2 

Pedals: Race Face Atlas pedals 

Wheels: Race Face Turbine R 27.5 wheels 

Tires: Maxxis Minion DHF DD MaxxGrip 27.5x2.50WT Fr / Maxxis Assegai DD MaxxGrip 27.5x2.50WT Rr 

Seatpost: Race Face Turbine R 175mm drop, 30.9 

Saddle: WTB Volt 

Click here to visit the 2021 Slayer builds.

 

 

 

 

 

Previous Feature The Jank Files - Season 2, Episode 1 It's hard to believe that the 2020 EWS season kicked off 344 days after the 2019 EWS season came to a close - but at this point we should probably be expecting the unexpected. It’s been a long year for everyone and the official enduro race season has only just begun.
Next Feature 2021 Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt – Jesse Munden’s custom build Quick and nimble, the Thunderbolt is all about being playful out there on the trail. What says that better than a kid who can nose bonk, spin, and jump just about anything. Jesse Munden is from Kamloops, British Columbia and at 14-years old is already making noise. He’s been on Rocky Mountain for the past few years and rides everything from a Slayer in the bike park to an Altitude Powerplay on the local trails – but the Thunderbolt is his favourite. The kid loves to jump, spin, and play – so we let him.
Feature

2021 Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt – Jesse Munden’s custom build

August 19, 2020

Quick and nimble, the Thunderbolt is all about being playful out there on the trail. What says that better than a kid who can nose bonk, spin, and jump just about anything. Jesse Munden is from Kamloops, British Columbia and at 14-years old is already making noise. He’s been on Rocky Mountain for the past few years and rides everything from a Slayer in the bike park to an Altitude Powerplay on the local trails – but the Thunderbolt is his favourite. The kid loves to jump, spin, and play – so we let him.

 

 

 

 

 

Frame: Thunderbolt Alloy, size Small, RIDE-9 Position 9 (Steepest)

Fork: Fox 34 Float EVOL Grip2 Factory Series 140mm

Shock: Fox DPX2 210x55mm, with Rocky Mountain shock bearing eyelets

Stem: Spank Spike 33mm reach, 35mm

Handlebar: Spank Spike Vibracore 780mm width, 35mm clamp, 25mm rise
Grips: Spank Spike

Brakes: Shimano SLX 180mm Fr | 180mm Rr

Shifter: Shimano Deore 12-speed

Derailleur: Shimano Deore 12-speed

Crankset: Race Face Aeffect

Cassette: Shimano Deore

Chain: Shimano Deore

Pedals: Spank Oozy

Wheels: Spank 350 wheels (with Tubes!)

Tires: Maxxis Dissector EXO MaxxTerra 27.5x2.40WT Fr and Rr

Seatpost: Fox Transfer Post 150mm drop, 30.9

Saddle: Spank Oozy

Click here to visit the 2021 Thunderbolt builds.

Previous Feature 2021 Rocky Mountain Slayer – Wade Simmons’ custom build The Slayer was designed to be ridden fast, sent off huge hits, and take the abuse of a bike park lap after lap. The Godfather of Freeride, Wade Simmons, has been sending it aboard Rocky Mountain for nearly 30 years. Wade put freeriding on the map, and he’s still out there sending it aboard custom-built bikes.
Next Feature 2021 Rocky Mountain Slayer – Thomas Vanderham’s custom build  The Slayer was designed to be ridden fast, sent off huge hits, and take the abuse of a bike park lap after lap. The Slayer has become a go-to platform for Rocky Mountain freerider, Thomas Vanderham - especially when it comes to spending time in the bike park. Thomas’ custom-built Slayer has some of what you’d expect, and some that you wouldn’t! 
Feature

Introducing the Overtimepack

June 25, 2020

IF SOME IS GOOD, MORE IS BETTER

The Overtimepack allows you to ride your Powerplay farther than ever before, putting more time in on the trail before needing a charge. 

The Overtimepack is a range extender for our Powerplay lineup that offers an additional 330 Wh of battery capacity. When combined with our massive 672 Wh Powerplay battery, you have over 1000 Wh to drain before it's time to rest. It's about more saddle time, more trail time, and more of the good times.

The Overtimepack drains its full 330 Wh capacity before you use any of the 672 Wh battery in your Powerplay. Your iWoc remote will read as fully charged until you begin to work your way through the main 672 Wh battery of the bike. The “RIDE MORE, FASTER, FURTHER” indicator on the Overtimepack will let you know how much of your 330 Wh battery remains.

  • No need to stop & swap batteries - Already plugged in, just keep riding.
  • Anti-rattle rigid attachment - Exterior battery mounts are notoriously sloppy. We offer a solid mount that’s designed for aggressive mountain biking.
  • Theft deterrent design - Tooled attachment discourages the theft of expensive accessories.
  • A more comfortable way to carry more energy - No need to carry a heavy battery on your back. Not only is it unsafe, but it can also throw your balance off.
  • A better handling eMTB - Overtimepack pack is located down low on the bike by the drive
     

CHARGING

You can use the standard Powerplay 5A charger for the Overtimepack (while attached). You can charge both batteries in parallel with two separate chargers even more quickly. Overtimepack can serve as a Jerrycan charger, filling the main battery without a charger. It takes 2.5 charges of the Overtimepack to Jerrycan fill a 672Wh Powerplay battery completely.


If the 672Wh battery in your Powerplay is empty, the Overtimepack will charge your battery to nearly 50% in a little over 2 hours.

Visit our Overtimepack or  Powerplay page for more information.

Filmed by Liam Mullany
Featuring Vaea Verbeeck
Photos by Margus Riga

Previous Feature 2021 Rocky Mountain Slayer – Thomas Vanderham’s custom build  The Slayer was designed to be ridden fast, sent off huge hits, and take the abuse of a bike park lap after lap. The Slayer has become a go-to platform for Rocky Mountain freerider, Thomas Vanderham - especially when it comes to spending time in the bike park. Thomas’ custom-built Slayer has some of what you’d expect, and some that you wouldn’t! 
Next Feature Sam Schultz on Starting the Montana NICA League
Feature

Two-wheeled passion

April 15, 2020






Get them started young! Everyone deserves a Rocky Mountain, even if you’re not ready to push the pedals yet. Starting with an easy to maneuver run bike, the Edge series offers a wheelsize for any young rider.
 
View the models

 

Previous Feature Sam Schultz on Starting the Montana NICA League
Next Feature The 2020 Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team We’re excited to return to the Enduro World Series this year with our existing Canadian partner, Race Face Performance Products.
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The 2020 Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team

March 06, 2020

We’re excited to return to the Enduro World Series this year with our existing Canadian partner, Race Face Performance Products. Over the past two years, the Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro team has made its mark on enduro racing and we’re thrilled to keep up that momentum. 

Over the past few seasons, we’ve watched Jesse Melamed, Andréane Lanthier Nadeau, and Rémi Gauvin come together as a team and add their own flavour to enduro racing. We’re proud to have all three of them on board this year and excited to bring the world along for the ride with a second season of “The Jank Files”.  

With the recent news of race cancellations in South America, we'll be ready as a team for when the race schedule is back to normal.

Peter Ostroski has been riding for Rocky Mountain in one way or another for 18 years! He’s been on every enduro race team we’ve ever had and these days his race schedule includes a mix of EWS races, the Trans Madeira, and the BC Bike Race. 2020 marks a particularly exciting season for Peter, with the announcement of his home tracks being raced at the EWS #6 in Burke, Vermont. 

Previous Feature Two-wheeled passion Learning to Love the Ride during a pandemic
Next Feature Guiding in the Dolomites I’ve spent several years riding my mountain bike through remote, little-known places around the world. Usually, I’m barely back at home before the next wave of wanderlust comes over me and I feel the pull to set off again. 
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Guiding in the Dolomites

February 25, 2020
We hope this story inspires you and allows you to daydream about your past riding adventures. As riders, we know that spending time on the trails helps us during these times of uncertainty, but we ask that you minimize the risks to yourself and others, and join us in following all local health guidelines as you venture outside.

 

Story by Julia Hofmann
Photos by Mattias Fredriksson

When I was young and exploring in the garden and woods around my house, I always found the most joy in sharing my discoveries with others; a new hiding spot or some exciting forest treasure. As I’ve gotten older, it’s still a favourite pastime, only now my world extends further, and my discoveries are much bigger.   

I’ve spent several years riding my mountain bike through remote, little-known places around the world. Usually, I’m barely back at home before the next wave of wanderlust comes over me and I feel the pull to set off again. 

I am fascinated by the people I’ve met, different cultures and landscapes I’ve experienced, and the incredible singletrack I’ve ridden. Each country has had unique trails; in Chile they are deep and dusty, in Canada they are steep and technical tracks through the forest, and in Norway the trails run between the fjords and over stone slabs and tree roots. Kosovo, Albania, France, Spain – each has had a different flavour. In sharing details about my travels, I am able to inspire others to also explore the world with their bikes – and it feels as joyful as sharing my garden hiding spots back in the day.  

It was this passion for travel and inclusion that led to my guiding career. I wanted to help other mountain bikers enjoy what I was experiencing; nature, the trails, and the local culture in these special places. So when I was asked if I wanted to do some skills training and guiding in the Dolomites, I couldn’t refuse. 

The Dolomites are one of the most unique and impressive rock formations in the world. And although they are just three and a half hours drive from where I live, I had never been to the area. I only knew of the Dolomites through winter sports and road bike racing – every road biker dreams of doing the famous Sellaronda route one day – but I had no idea that a world-class mountain biking paradise was also tucked away there.

When I finally stood in the mountains there I was overwhelmed by impressiveness of the landscape. Whichever way I looked – north, south, east or west – each and every vista was picture-postcard worthy. The sight of these huge, sheer rockfaces rising up out of the pale green undulating meadows is so powerful that it literally takes your breath away. The infrastructure is perfect for mountain bikers too; all the gondolas take bikes and there are plenty of lifts to access the riding zones. I knew instantly that this was one of those big discoveries and I couldn’t wait for the joy of sharing it with others. 

For the first few years, I found the layout of the mountains confusing. There are so many different interconnecting valleys in the Dolomites that I would suddenly find myself in the wrong one. Often it would be getting late and I had no idea how to get back to where I was meant to be. (Having an e-bike came in handy in these situations.) I was grateful that my friend, Arno Feichter runs the local bike shop in Sexten and is also a guide. He gave me the lay of the land and also introduced me to all the secret little gems that can only be found with local knowledge. 

The natural trails here are steep and technical at the top, often taking you over rugged, rocky slab formations – with no room for error. Further down the valley and below the treeline, the ground gets softer and the trails become more flowy and playful, with a slippery tree root here and a natural berm there. Back down at the bottom, it’s either time for a pizza or another lift to head back up the mountain.

Over the past few years, more and more flow trails have been developed in the Dolomites, allowing even the greenest of mountain bikers to enjoy the high-mountain scenery and creating the perfect environment for my beginners’ skills courses. Combining a guided experience with some skills training – correct position for braking, pushing, and jumping – allows riders to feel more confident and therefore get more enjoyment out of the trails and stunning environment.

Whenever I’m in the area, Arno shows me yet another, even more stunning trail in the Tre Cime region. Last autumn we spent five days together; on E-bike reccies, carrying our regular mountain bikes up technical sections via ferratas, and doing laps on the Helm; the local mountain near the village of Sexten. And even with that, I’ve hardly even covered a quarter of the trails, so there really is plenty experience – and share. 

Julia Hofmann has been a part of the Rocky Mountain family for several years. While she spends her time on a myriad of different bikes from us, the ones featured in this article include her Altitude Powerplay, Altitude, and Slayer

Previous Feature The 2020 Rocky Mountain Race Face Enduro Team We’re excited to return to the Enduro World Series this year with our existing Canadian partner, Race Face Performance Products.
Next Feature Electric Adventures Greg Hill has spent the last two years of his life focused on proving the potential of electric adventures. He gave up using fossil fuels to access his adventures and has worked hard at the idea of exploring what it means to adventure sustainably.
Feature

Electric Adventures

January 17, 2020

Story by: Greg Hill
Photos by: Bruno Long

The topic of electric mountain bikes tends to be a polarizing conversation these days and people can be defensive and confrontational, no matter what side of the coin they’ve chosen. In my mind, the general adoption of e-bikes as a means of transportation is a given and the conversations would be more constructive if they focused on how and why they can improve our lives and took a step away from a judgmental “no way” stance.

I’ve spent the last two years of my life focused on proving the potential of electric adventures. I gave up using fossil fuels to access my adventures and have worked hard at the idea of exploring what it means to adventure sustainably. Living in British Columbia, 98% of our electricity is renewable hydroelectricity. If there’s ever a place where an electric vehicle make sense, it’s here. A major challenge I gave myself when switching to a more sustainable way of adventuring was to try and summit 100 peaks through the use of my skis, climbing shoes, running shoes, or on my mountain bike - accessing everything with the help of an electric car. By accomplishing this goal, I proved that electric cars are viable as adventures vehicles but couldn’t help but wonder what other modes of transportation could help the process. What were some ways in which I could travel further into the backcountry where my little hatchback didn’t want to go? Or what about other people that were interested in the idea of a sustainable adventure but couldn’t afford a $45,000 car?

Naturally, my electric exploration took me into the field of e-bikes. I had ripped around on an Instinct Powerplay in our trail network which is usually for shuttling and it was an eye-opening experience. My friend and I rode right from town, climbed to the top easily, laughing and chatting on the climb, and had an absolute blast coming back down. The Instinct Powerplay proved itself to me as a viable way to work the local trail network, but what about as an adventure mobile?

Last spring, I set up a Growler Powerplay for going places in a simpler way and without the use of my electric car. I’d set it up for nearly every type of adventure I could think of which included panniers and baskets on the front and back for my climbing gear, running gear, and most importantly my ski gear. It's a little odd for such a sick mountain bike to become a gear-laden donkey, but I promised it some great adventures.

I had no idea how useful this e-bike was going to be. Since I’m a skier first and foremost, my first goal was to ride my e-bike out of town, and climb and ski Revelstoke’s iconic peak, Mount Begbie. I’d skied Mount Begbie many times before, but setting out and riding 15km to the trailhead, summiting, shredding, and then an E-asy ride home was both simple and rewarding.

That trip up Mount Begbie was just the start of my time on the Growler Powerplay and what truly blew my mind was something I hadn’t expected; the fact that it opened up the door to adventures for others in my family. My 13-year old daughter took the bike for a 20km ride simply because she was having a great daydream and wanted it to continue. She’s not one for cardio and I’ve always had trouble motivating her to get and explore with me. There was another day where she was determined to join me on a road ride, and spent the time coaching me on the climbs with both encouragement and enthusiasm.

My 70-year old dad, who is not a very active person, threw his leg over the Growler Powerplay and joined me on a road ride up to the Revelstoke Dam. While I huffed and puffed my way up the valley, I couldn’t help but recognize how special it was to be able to go and exercise with my dad. Opportunities like this have never come along before, and it was the e-MTB that made it a reality.

Last July, my friend and I borrowed two Instinct Powerplay’s and headed to Joss Mountain for what was sure to be an epic ride. I was sitting at 98 summits accessed electrically and I wanted to get to the top of a mountain by e-bike. The Joss Mountain trail ascends 1100m and is about 17km return with several hike-a-bike sections. This trail was built to access a summit lookout for monitoring wild fires and was not designed to be ridden. For the sections that were too steep to pedal (even with the assistance of the drive system), the “walk-mode” feature kept us moving onward and upward towards peak #99.

 

 

 

 

 

All summer, I used the Growler Powerplay to rip around town, get groceries, go rock climbing, and cut down the time spent getting to trailheads. Sure, I could have ridden by normal mountain bike to them but this allowed me more energy for the activities themselves. And being honest with myself, even though it’s only 2 km into town I sometimes get lazy and don’t want to pedal my mountain bike. The e-bike helped me overcome that that laziness and all of a sudden it just seemed simpler with less involved to ride than drive.

Now that it’s winter again, I’ll use the bike less as the roads here are completely covered in snow. Yet when the roads are clear I’m happy to pedal up to the local ski resort, Revelstoke Mountain Resort, where their electric-run lifts align with my own beliefs. When the roads open up again in the spring I’ll be back pedalling up logging roads to access deeper backcountry ski routes.

I knew getting onto an e-bike made sense with my eco-conscious activities, but I didn’t really realize how many doors it would open for me and my family. The potential of these bikes is as endless as the dreams I can create.
 
Previous Feature Guiding in the Dolomites I’ve spent several years riding my mountain bike through remote, little-known places around the world. Usually, I’m barely back at home before the next wave of wanderlust comes over me and I feel the pull to set off again. 
Next Feature Frozen Bikes and Big Descents: Thomas Vanderham takes on the Variables of Trans-Cascadia With a career spanning two decades, Thomas Vanderham has dabbled in just about every style of riding going – he’s clearly best known for his freeriding edits – but it’s been some time since he’s participated in anything with a timing chip. “This was a little bit of a departure for me, but I’m always open to new experiences,” he says of his experience at Trans-Cascadia; a 4-day backcountry enduro held in the depths of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest in Washington state.

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